Klipsch Cornwall Floorstanding Speakers

Cornwall

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User Reviews (84)

Showing 1-10 of 84  
Victor   Casual Listener [Jan 16, 2017]

With Certain Vega Floor standing speakers to improve their sound is a cheap and quick fix. Simply seal up the rear ports. This will turn them into acoustic suspension speakers. Muddy bass will be gone replaced by a smooth base. It will also slightly lower the volume of the woofer. That allow the midrange and tweeters to play louder giving a clear detailed sound, more audiophile.
For the Cornwall 3s many people don't like the sound of the midrange horn. Simple fix is to change the crossover frequency from the woofer to midrange. Bring the woofer father up and the same with the midrange. Example cut the woofer off at 6khz. This will release the midrange so it doesn't have to work as hard improving the sound. A $10 fix.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
geoff.   Audio Enthusiast [Jul 13, 2016]

Review is for Cornwall 1's, last production run. K-77 tweeter with square magnet, K-57-K squaker, K-33-E woofer with square magnet, and B-3 crossover.

Over the years I have owned many speakers I THOUGHT were good, really good.

At some point Klipsch Heresy's came into my life and they changed my appreciation of music forever. But I still like the bass in my face. But ONLY if it is in phase! Even with a separate subwoofer under each speaker I could not get the right sound.

I thought I found the answer with a monster pair of Cerwin-Vega CLSC 215's. That is until I listened to the Herseys agian and heard how much detail was missing to get that bass.

Then I stumbled onto this pair of Cornwalls. The most I ever paid for a set of speakers, and now I know why.

I have no use for any other speaker in a two channel set-up now. Sold nearly all of them, Heresy's included, model I's and II's. Sold the Vega's. Sold the PSB Stratus Silver i's.

The Forte II's I own have detail, but the Corwalls have all that AND the punch in the gut! Even at LOW volume they deliver impact. They beg to be turned up. Not because they need to be louder, but because it doesn't make any sense not to!

No compression at high volume, no lack of detail at any volume, and the BASS, rock solid bass. I think having the drivers behind the motorboard allows them to be enjoyed in a normal sized room without having to sit 20 feet away.

Once you have heard horns, and like them, you are hooked. Once you hear a 15" woofer, you are hooked. These have it all and sound like they go much lower than the 38 hz spec'd.

And this is a 32 year old pair of un-modified speakers! Cornscala anyone?

I cannot imagine how dynamic the Cornwall III's sound!

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Fielding Dickey   Audio Enthusiast [Jan 20, 2016]

In 1978 I traded 2 Heresys and some cash for my Cornwalls. They moved with me too Florida, have stayed with me during three marriages, and there is a good possibility they will be buried with me. They are the only speakers I've heard whose horns could cut you like a knife while that big 15" woofer beat the breath out of you, I remember reading that during an electronics trade show in the mid 70's Paul Klipsch, to show how efficient the Cornwall was, hooked them up a 1 watt transistor radio (remember those?) and turned the volume up to the point of pain and with no distortion. Even with 100 watt maximum they can break your windows and have neighbors call the police. THAT'S why I got them and why I won't part with them for any amount of money. I love my Cornwalls.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Randy   Audio Enthusiast [Feb 20, 2011]

My pair of Klipsch Cornwalls just turned 31 years old and they are just as beautiful and sound like they did 31 years ago. They are still such an impressive speaker and so efficient. They are a tank. When buying speakers remember you get what you pay for. I think I paid about $1,600 for the pair in 1980 and they are worth more today than when I bought them.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Tomski   Audio Enthusiast [Nov 04, 2010]

I still can remember the first time I saw a pair of Klipsch Cornwalls. I was initially draw to them for their enormous size, I was 20 years old and I couldn't believe how effortless their sound was, It seemed to just flow through the speaker in a manner I wasn't familar with.
I had to have them ! I went home knowing the next day I was going back to buy them. After a little bargaining I ended up with their demo pair. They were 1983 CWOs. Now 27 years later, I am still just has impressed as I was that first day. Klipsch Heritage speakers work for decades!
There are few things in the consumer world, that you can use on a daily basis and expect to get 30,40,50,or more years of use out of. Klipsch Heritage speakers are one of those items. In one of their brochures they talked about a Heritage speaker being a lifetime investment, Well that is exactly what they are.
If you checkout the review here from 7/20/99 it is from Mitja Borko. He is the author of the " Klipsch Cornwall Loudspeaker Systems- Test report on electroacoustic measurements and listening evaluation"
He has a Masters in Science and is also an Electrical Engineer, In his own words he has " Tested hundreds of loudspeakers"
I first read his review after owning my CWs for about 17 years. His review confirmed everything I ever felt or thought about these speakers. Im sure someone on the Klipsch website could get you a copy if requested. Mitja also gives some praise to the Rogers LS3/5A speakers, Checkout some of the reviews for those speakers and you should be able sense a passion about their speakers as well.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Jim Y   AudioPhile [Sep 23, 2010]

Oh my gosh, where do I begin. I replaced Bose 901's in 1981 with a used pair of Cornwalls because the 901's did not have enouph bottom for my taste, I started out with a Marantz 2270 reciever, 140 watts. I then plugged in a Carver M400 amp initially to drive the 901's. The 2270 did not have the guts to drive the 901's. The Carver had 5 times the power needed to run the Cornwalls. I now had the volume I desired. Along came the kids and the morgage and college and weddings. I enjoyed the setup for a long time . My kids are grown and I finally upgraded the old stuff. I now have a Martin Logan sub, the Parasound Halo p-3 preamp and the Parasound 2125 250 watt amp and a Cambridge 540c Cd player. Wow!!!. My 30 plus year old Cornwalls ROCK anew. The highs are crystal clean and the mids are powerful. The base is enhanced by the Martin Logan sub. I thought of replacing the Cornwalls, but no more. Klipsch Cornwall speakers are timeless. Buy a pair now and you will never need another speaker.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Dan   Audio Enthusiast [Jul 31, 2010]

I bought my Cornwalls in 1975 and have never regretted it. Today, 35 years later, they sound as good as ever.
I was attracted to the bass from the 15 inch woofers and have not heard their equal. The quality and longevity surpassed all my expectations. Kudos to Klipsch for a job well done.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
cstewart   Audio Enthusiast [Mar 08, 2010]

In 1986 I bought 2 new Klipsch Cornwalls to compete with a friend of mine that had the Cornerhorns. (Yes we were young and foolish.) Although he paid more for his horns, we concluded that my cornwalls with the two horns and 15inch base was just as good, and actually better for the money.
To this day, 2010, they are the best sounding speakers I have ever heard. Over the years I have had several sets of "modern" tech surround sound systems made by Sony, Panasonic and HK, but still, nothing touches the rush of pushing air like the Cornwalls.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
j bourne   Audio Enthusiast [Jan 21, 2010]

Hi,
Like a few others--I have owned everything...but have kept many--and my solution is 3 systems--- [1 [ in the den, ARC tube stuff w/ Theils, [1 ] quad Bose 901 Ser 1 in the bedroom w/a Phase 400 etc, and my Living room set, Cornwalls, ARC Tube amp, ss preamp, etc. Unlike the other commentors---I was an audio sales rep back in the 70's including Klipsch.Always liked the Corwalls.
My oddity I suspect-- is after having my K horns for over 20 years--- I just never was that happy w/ them. So I bought a pr of Cornwalls a few years ago and A-B'd them w/ the K Horns.The K-Horns are gone.
I like my sound wet and fat---and the Corwalls do it just right... The K-horns were like a dry white wine......
Best, jpb

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Boomzillas   AudioPhile [Aug 14, 2009]

I have used multiple Klipsch products over the years. They include Heresy 1, Heresy 2, La Scala 1, and Cornwall 1 speakers. I spent significant time auditioning other products (Klipschorn, Belle Klipsch, and numerous newer "non-Heritage" models). I am currently running a pair of Heresy 2 speakers with a VERY nice M&K subwoofer.

Additionally, I've owned a variety of non-Klipsch expensive speakers including Dahlquist DQ-10, KEF 102.b, Magneplanar III, Tannoy, B&W, Ohm Walsh, JBL, Yamaha, Electro Voice, Infinity, Revel F-30, Avalon Symbol, etc.

Obviously, I've been in audio for over 30 years. I'm familiar with both solid state and tube electronics. As a matter of fact, I used to design and sell modifications to Dynaco tube gear.

The bottom line is, having listened to just about every combo on the market for all this time, I'm ready to just kick back and enjoy listening. My choice of a "for the rest of my life" speaker is: (you guessed it) the Klipsch Cornwall.

Why? Numerous reasons including:

1. Exceptional dynamics - The Cornwalls can sound dynamic at any listening volume. Most "cones in boxes" and particularly most planar speakers have to play at or above a certain volume before they "come alive." The Cornwalls, being horn loaded, can sound explosive even at almost inaudible volumes. This lets the speakers be played at significantly lower volume without losing the sense of hearing real music. Don't think that this dynamics issue is trivial - it is what makes most speakers sound like speakers and not live music. The "jump factor" on Cornwalls is just higher than on any other speaker I've owned or heard.

2. Ultimate volume capability - The Cornwalls can play LOUDLY when desired. It is probable that the fully-horn-loaded Klipsches such as the Klipschorn, La Scala, and Belle Klipsch can play at higher ultimate loudness than the Cornwalls, but in my home, I'll never notice the difference. Further, unlike most speakers, the dynamics don't compress at super high volumes. Most speakers just settle into a loud roar at high volume - not so the Cornwalls. The Cornwalls still sound like music even at rip-your-head-off levels.

3. Sensitivity - This characteristic is related to the first two. Without sensitivity, you don't get dynamics or ultimate volume (without a million watts of input and the likelihood of blowing your tweeters). The Cornwalls can play both dynamically and loudly with the most modestly powered of electronics. With right at 100 decibels (dB) of output with a single watt of electrical input, the Cornwalls can be driven by low-powered receivers, tube amplifiers, or even integrated amplifiers (listen to an old Pioneer SA-5100 integrated amp at 10 watts per channel if you don't believe me). Of course, with sensitivity comes the likelihood of hearing any hiss, hum, or noise in your electronics. Good electronics can be clearly heard and appreciated through the Cornwalls. Bad electronics will not be tolerated. Cheap doesn't necessarily mean bad, though; I have a bottom-of-the-barrel Yamaha AV receiver that sounds sweet and clean!

4. Bass response - With specified frequency response to the low 30's, the Cornwalls, for most people, will go low enough in the bass that no subwoofer will be needed. This is a MAJOR advantage for several reasons. First, if a subwoofer is to be good, it must go both low and clean. Most cheap subwoofers can't do either. The ones that can cost more than the Cornwalls. Second, for a subwoofer to work with music and not just movies, it must remain flat in frequency response across its range. Most subwoofers don't. They're tuned as "one note boom boxes" for impact on movies and really don't sound good on music. Third, with a subwoofer, you lose stereo bass. All the bass response below the subwoofer crossover frequency is routed to the single (mono) subwoofer. For movies, who cares. But for music, there is often stereo content into the bass frequencies that just gets lost with a mono subwoofer.

5. Appearance - This is, of course, a very subjective issue. Some people think that speakers should be "out of sight; out of mind." The Cornwalls (particularly in a nice veneer finish) are more like fine wood furniture. The proportions are pleasing (particularly with the optional risers) and the speakers are handsome.

So what don't I like about the Cornwalls? Very little. My few objections would include:

1. The 15" woofers cross over to the small horn midrange at 600 to 700 Hertz (Hz). In the upper frequencies of the woofer, there is slightly less detail than would be delivered by, for example, the La Scalas whose larger midrange horn takes over at 400 Hz. For most music, this is never noticeable, but it occasionally is.

2. The 15" woofers can sound sloppy with some amplifiers. Tube amplifiers, in particular, with their high transformer output resistance and subsequently poor damping factor, make for less than tight bass (sometimes). Despite the theoretical disadvantages of tube amplifiers, some do a wonderful job of driving the Cornwalls' bass, so audition carefully before you buy amplification. If the tube amp you already have sounds wooly in the bass when driving the Cornwalls, try another amp. Most solid-state amps provide awesome bass with the Cornwalls.

3. The older Cornwalls use an Electro-Voice T-35 tweeter mounted ** behind ** the 3/4 inch thick baffle board. This, in my opinion, causes the tweeter to sound dull (particularly off axis). Uncle Paul Klipsch did this deliberately since he wanted the speakers to function when placed either in a corner or on the wall (get it - Corn - Wall?). To avoid so much treble reflection when in corners, the dispersion of the tweeter (and the midrange, for that matter) were limited by mounting them behind the baffle board. The easy remedy is to either listen directly on-axis or to buy the Series 2 or 3 Cornwalls (which have their tweeters mounted on the front of the baffle board).

That's it - I have no further criticism of the Cornwalls or their sound. That is VERY unusual. Most speakers could receive pages and pages of negatives. The overall excellence of the Cornwalls makes them my first choice for my home. If you've never auditioned a Klipsch Cornwall, do yourself a favor. Give the Cornwalls a fair try with music that you're familiar with and decent amplification. You'll be glad you did.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-10 of 84  

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