Aiwa NSX-A707 Mini Systems

NSX-A707

Compact Disk Stereo System

User Reviews (8)

Showing 1-8 of 8  
George F. Greenwald   an Audiophile [Dec 17, 1998]

I just purchased the Aiwa NSX-A707, the sister system to the A303, 404, etc. This model is very similar to the others, but has some enhancements that make it somewhat outstanding from its siblings. In particular, it begins to provide for surround sound and other external devices. It has an 80 watt per channel amplifier, extermal microphone inputs, and is the first in the series that has extra input and output terminals: an external low level input from such devices as a mini-disk, or a computer, as well as a low level input that can be fed to an external amplifier, amplified speakers, or to a computer sound card (my particular interest). It also has two channel output to an amplified sub-woofer, and two channels of amplified output to surround speakers.
The Aiwa has three way speakers that feature a 6 inch woofer, 3 inch mid-range and a ceramic tweeter.

At a street price of $230 to $280 this is an outstanding system that rivals some of my studio quality equipment. And that is quite an addmission from one convinced that good sound only comes from high-end equipment.

The sound is relatively pleasant, especially in the mid-range, but is slightly "peaky" toward the high end, as well as below 100 cycles. The very versatile graphic equalizer does provide some ability to manage the sound profile by reshaping the output. It is surprising how much "clean" sound can be obtained from such small drivers.

I have a pair of Altec Lansing speakers (8 inch woofer and dome tweeter) that I and am able to swap between those and the speakers that Aiwa supplied. The Aiwa's are ported bass-reflex type, while the Altecs are dynamicy suspended. The sound on the Altec speakers is much smoother, indicating that the amplifier output is both level and adequate to drive the less efficient speakers. In truth the best sound I've achieved is with both sets of speakers hooked to the amplifier output.

The Aiwa speakers are provided with a 15 ft length of 24 guage wire already attached to the interior of the enclosures, preventing one from using truly adequate wiring for an 80 watt amplifier. I suggest curring the wires short and attaching at least 12 guage wire to get to the amplifier.

The controls, as in the entire family of midi-systems, are multi-functional, and therefore somwhat criptic. Following the directions one can achieve a surprising array of effects. However, for those not able to program their VCRs, this combination of buttons and "Multi-Jog" controls will be a nightmare. Have someone else set them up for you.

The Tuner has excellent reception; the CD drive output is as good as any I've heard in systems costing over $1000, and the tape output is excellent. If anything, it lacks only in that there is no indication whether the dual tape units encode in Dolby B or some other proprietary noise reducing system. I have tried tapes encoded with both the B and C series, and am able to get good results with either. My portable dbX encoder/decoder is not usable since there is no external processor loop. However, at this price, that is not meant to be a complaint.

I evaluated nearly all of the midi systems available today. I don't think that even the systems costing two to three times the price provide anything (other than surround speakers) that this unit lacks in quality or versatility. My vote was and is clearly for the 707 not only as the best Midi system, but as my replacement for an entire rack of larger far more expensive individual components.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
Mike Weaver   an Audio Enthusiast [Jan 04, 1999]

The Aiwa NSX-A707 is not a bad system when it comes to highs and lows. In fact it has very crisp highs and excellent bass reproduction. Where this system falls short is in the mid-range. If you're into heavy guitar, this system just falls short. It has an adjustable equalizer, but it can only alter the highs and lows and can not even affect the mid-range. There is also no balance control, but that is minor. If you like techno, then this is probably your system. If you like rock, be warned that this system, and all Aiwa systems, do not provide quality sound in the mid-range. Personally, I am going to return this system and shop around for one with a more full range.

OVERALL
RATING
2
VALUE
RATING
James   an Audio Enthusiast [Jan 01, 1999]

Well I just bought this new system the Awia nsx-a707. 8 years ago. I had a big $1500 system. All different components. Even 2 single tape dekes for better dubing.It sounded good to me then. It was only 35 watts a chanel.
This new mini system is 80! (WOW) It is loded with features. 5 pre set eq settings. Then 5 you can make up.
It also has a sound deal to give you simulated sounds. Such as movie, hall, live, ect. Also alot of other things I am still learning. I was in awe of the sound. The speakers it comes with are 6 oms. My old ones were 8. I use to go in high end stores when I had my med. old system, and listen to the rich sound of the best. I tell you what this is that sound. Very rich clear sound. The hook ups in the back are numerous. Enough for 2 more spearkers, a sub box. It has enough for 3 more components. I have a highfi vcr on it now. My tv sound great. For $240, or maybe a little higher
buy it. 7 years ago a system like this would have cost $2,000 at least. I am not joking. I think it would of.
James

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
thomas   a Casual Listener [Jan 16, 1999]

Yeah rating 5 star that is why i bought it. I am going to return it, and shop around more. To me rating 5 star must be perfectly... such as balance, controling level BASS, TREBLE. But that is okay, I going to find better one.

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
victor   an Audio Enthusiast [Mar 13, 1999]

I think this system is a good value. For less than $250 you get a potent 80 watts per channel and pretty decent bass. The midrange power is a little weak but it's still a good system overall. If you have less than $300 to spend, I would recommend the aiwa.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
Dimitry L   an Audio Enthusiast [Jul 14, 1999]

I got mine recently, and now for just $200! The price, of course, was so low because it is now considered to be a "last year's model." I did not notice any significant difference in quality between this one and the equivalent 99 model (trying both of them in stores), but in fact, there was a difference in the price ($200 vs. $300-400, which i just couldn't afford). So I bought this one. The only thing it lacks in comarison to the 99 AIWA mini systems is the built-in subwoofers, which, again, from my humble listening experience, do not make any difference in the actual bass reproduction compared to the older plain 3-way AIWA speakers which NSX-A707 has. The system has about all the cool features you'd see in a pretty expensive new 99 stereo, plus the DSP which does cool echo as well as the known "sewer pipe effect," so it's a real bargain if you're still able to find it in stores!
I've read some complaints about the equalizer in this system not being able to adjust the middle frequencies. Well, I'll tell you that's true ... but can I ask you one question then? Okay, now, how often do you touch the mid-frequency sliders on your current equalizer? (if one allows do to this of course) I bet I'd hear many "never" responses to that question, eh? Because on my old double deck recorder those two sliders were constantly at 3/4 from the top at any time, and absolutely not depending on the style and volume of the music! :)

I hooked it up to my SB Live! Value sound card and now can compose and listen to MIDI music and do tracking with quite a relatively impressive sound output. Don't know, I'm very happy with the purchase! :)

Good luck!

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
Glottis   an Audio Enthusiast [Jul 19, 1999]

The NSX-A707 is big and powerful, with a booming 80 watts per channel. It has a lot of cool features like surround sound, built-in rythms such as salsa and rock, and even a built-in game.(It's a little slot machine.) It delivers thundering bass and yet clear, defined treble. The sound is not distorted at the full volume of 50, which is an indication that the speakers can handle a lot of power. The whole middle unit has tons of green and red lights and smoky, thinted plastic. This stereo is as cool as sh*t.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
Ryan Rayda   Audiophile [Nov 24, 1999]
Strength:

A healthy little system with some useful features and a great sound for the price.

Weakness:

Juvenile controls and aesthetics with some of the most horrifying processing and tone controls I have ever been subjected to.

Sound:

Bass is extremely boomy, please never use the T-bass setting which stands for Terrible-Bass. All it manages to do is make the little plastic-cased, unbraced speakers go thud.
And what in god's name is the BBE processing all about? Turning this on reminds me of blatantly false sounding vocals such as the pre-processed super-harmonized-for-your- protection type of vocals that are present in so much of the pop drivel gracing the record store shelves today. Wanna know how you make your voice sound like that? Go into the studio and ask them to harmonize your vocal tracks. Ask the engineer to make 'em really fake, ask him to make you sound like Brittney Spears. He can, I promise. But wait, you have your very own vocal harmonizer now, your Aiwa stereo system. Now you can plug a mic into the A-707, crank up the BBE and get similar results in the comfort of your very own home. If you really had a mind to, you could even make Springstten sound like a little teenie-bopper pop star with the BBE option. Never heard a more convincingly fake presentation in your life--got my money-back gaurantee. But if that's what does it for ya . .
Also, the DSP modes (this stands for dysfunctional sound production, I think) and so-called surround modes are likely the most horrendous musical experiences I have experienced to date. I think I have heard clearer, more coherently soundstaged material come out of the circa 1940 horns at the baseball field in town.


Looks:

The display makes me want to fall into throes of an epileptic seizure despite my complete lack of epilepsy--yet another offering to the god of flashy lights and the short attention span. Thank the god of moderation that it can be turned of with a seemingly magical and cryptic combination of power-on and multiple button pressing. Again, praise to the all-pervasive gods of excess.


The Low-Down:

Looking back at the above rantings and ravings, one would think that I hated this little $250 box of bells and whistles. Actually it is about the best mini-system I have ever heard. If you take the cheap plastic grilles off ( makes the treble audible) off the speakers and set them up with some semblence of a care for room placement, you will have a commendable sounding little stereo. Not anything that'll make you sell your separates, but enough to give you a fleeting glimpse into the realm of audio Nirvana.

But remember:
-- NEVER use the processing, any of it (unless you want Clapton to sound like Madonna)
-- Never leave the grilles on the speakers (make the treble audible, its better that way, trust me)
-- Never leave the display on for more than five minute intervals (making sure to only do so while closely supervised to avoid death from seizuring)

********** Never buy another mini-system until you have heard this one, it really is good for a mini-system.

Similar Products Used: Philips, Sony, Sanyo (all auditioned in-house before settling on the Aiwa)
OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
4
Showing 1-8 of 8  

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