Grado SR225i On-Ear

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Grado SR225i On-Ear 

DESCRIPTION

The SR225s sound unlike any other headphone. They have an amazingly solid presentation, packed with weight and presence. There is also a pleasant richness in the midrange that benefits all types of music

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-10 of 31  
[Nov 04, 2013]
Merid Levin
AudioPhile

Eventually the upper-mids and treble became too much to bear. At first blush they sounded great, but then they wore on me. They also became very uncomfortable after 30 minutes or so. You need to sit with them for a while and experience the fit before buying. I guess you could spend more money on new aftermarket pads, but then why buy them just to tweak around.

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
2
[Jul 06, 2011]
Stuart M
Audio Enthusiast

The whole Grado Prestige line-up share a very similar "sound" - it is worth noting that if you intend use with an MP3 player or other such device, you may aswell stick with the SR60. The SR-225 is a fabulous headphone but it really is best used with top electronics - expect disappointment from cheap sources! They sound pretty good out of most amps although a top source is a must.

Very important to note is that my 225's are now no longer in stock form. I have replaced the cups with larger cups (gives nicer tone) and have removed both the front and rear dustcovers. I also fitted Sennheiser 414 pads which are super comfy and sound spot on. I tried a set of quarter-modded 414 pads but they're not as good as stock!

If a friend asked me what headphones should he/she buy for general use, I'd tell them a Grado SR60. If they were interested in more serious listening, I'd say an SR225 - the only "sensibly priced top headphone" that is listenable from a portable too.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Nov 24, 2007]
Phil Canard
AudioPhile

Strength:

For those who prefer a colored sound over real reference quality sound. Reference sound is not pretty to some who need enhancements in their music for it to sound pretty. Some people call Grado sound exciting. You can pack Grado phones away easily as the cans swivel to a flatter shape than most.

Weakness:

Grado is falling behind in upgrading their headphones. Larger companies with more R&D money are taking headphones more seriously now and thus you have the upgraded DT880, K601 or K701, HD 595 or HD 650 or a number of recently imported Audio Technica models. Some people call Grado sound fatigueing. Supraaural designs are not as comfy as circumaural designs, and less open sounding. I hate Y-cords on headphones.

I once used Grado and Sennheiser headphones. My Grado headphones would get irritating, then I would switch to the Sennheisers and get a bit bored. I now use top model AKG and Beyerdynamic headphones, and am not looking back. I owned and listened to several of the SR series Grado cans, and they all have a family sound. AKG K601 or K701 will get you better mids and keep the dynamic nature. Beyerdynamic DT880 gets you better treble and more extended bass. Either will be far more comfortable in long listening sessions. There is no accounting for taste, so some peopele are going to put up with and even prefer Grado headphones. This isn't 1991 anymore, and the headphone world has changed for the rest of us. Grado neeeds to update their comfort level, build quality and sound response curve if they want to compete as a refined headphone. They sound is now seen as in the rowdy rebel camp, and that appeals to some at first. Then you get the headphones home and get to know them over time. Perhaps some ears need the exaggerated response curve of Grado, but I would advise you to listen to some of the top new models by Audio Technica, AKG or Beyerdynamic before buying Grado. Sennheiser is normally too laid back for me, but I would still take them over Grado over the comfort issues. The other four companies I named build most of the pro microphones used by recording studios. Grado does not. They do not have the capability to compete in that camp. The other four companies can design headphones at reasonable prices that more properly reproduce what the microphone picked up, and that is why you will see many more of them than Grado in a recording studio. Many feel that Grado headphones give a colored sound, and I agree. If the coloration sounds good to you, then OK.

Grado headphones are sort of an EQ control for audiophiles who think EQ controls on their equipment are no good. If so, then buy Grado and have fun. The rest of use can buy a DT880 or K701, add a midbass hump and more low treble emphasis with a graphic equalizer, and get a similar sound to Grado while having more comfort and better soundstaging.

Grado Prestige series headphones are now really quite mediocre. Trends often continue past their useful era. Some people no doubt prefer carburetors to fuel injection. I keep my old SR60 as a backup, but rarely use it.

Customer Service

When I complained about lack of deep bass, the Grado service rep said it would come in about 2 weeks of break-in listening. It never did. Very little improvement. AKG and Beyerdynamic, even Sennheiser, beat it on deep bass. The break-in advice is to get customers to stick with a set of cans while their ears get used to the new sound.

Similar Products Used:

DT880, K601, and several more.

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
3
[May 03, 2007]
ebroyles
AudioPhile

Strength:

Quality of bass and construction

Weakness:

None

As a headphone connoisseur, I have had the opportunity and privilege to listen to some of the best headphones (Stax, Audio-Technica, AKG, Sennheiser, Sony, etc.) in the world. Based on my listening experience, Grado’s SR-225 is the best MP3 player Open headphones to listen to music to in the world. The quality of the treble and bass tones is very vivid, clear, and alive to the listener ears. With is plug and play capability, after using a 1/4 to 1/8 plug converter, the SR-225 requires no headphone amp to enjoy it its full capability. John Grado of Grado’s Lab has succeeded again at delivering a product beyond it time in quality, utility, usefulness, and value. Just think, this is only the beginning of a wonderful relationship with music.

Customer Service

None

Similar Products Used:

Stax, Audio-Technica, AKG, Sennheiser, Sony

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[May 03, 2007]
Eric Broyles
AudioPhile

Strength:

Excellent tonal qualities in the area of bass that require no further amplification.

Weakness:

None

As a headphone connoisseur, I have had the opportunity and privilege to listen to some of the best headphones (Stax, Audio-Technica, AKG, Sennheiser, Sony, etc.) in the world. Based on my listening experience, Grado’s SR-225 is the best MP3 player Open headphones to listen to music in the world. The quality of the treble and bass tones is very vivid, clear, and alive to the listener ears. With its plug and play capability, after using a 1/4 to 1/8 plug converter, the SR-225 requires no headphone amplification to enjoy it its full capability. John Grado of Grado’s Lab has succeeded again at delivering a product beyond it time in quality, utility, usefulness, and value. Just think, this is only the beginning of a wonderful relationship with music.

Customer Service

Excellent

Similar Products Used:

Stax, Audio-Technica, AKG, Sennheiser, Sony

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Feb 22, 2006]
mclaneone
Audio Enthusiast

Strength:

Obvious clarity and accuracy.

Weakness:

Some ranges (bass and highs) can be slightly distorted, but I don't know for sure if it's source material.

Buying these headphones was an experiment in trying to hear the reeds on John Coltrane's sax and seeing if it's true that a good pair of headphones can compare to really good loudspeakers which I'm not willing to afford. For general support, I relied on the many reviews on A/V reviews because I'm not as fully informed as the panelists are. I'm now catapulted into a realm close to that of the true audiophiles. My first revelation with the 225's was in hearing Bobby McFadden's "Round Midnight" off an old Fisher receiver. I thought I felt a tear. And I didn't even think I liked Bobby. The great round of applause I've heard for this instrument says enough. I think the burn in requirement is bogus (some people even talk about burning in connection cables, that;s crazy). What's really going on is that people get used to the sound of a particular instrument over time. If they like it after a while, they think it's "burned in". High tech glues and materials, such as these headphones and (other loudspeakers)are made of, don't like being skaken loose and mellowed out any more than YOU would like that kind of treatment. There may be some exceptions. Audiophiles can be analytical beyond personal logic and the truth of real listening. So buy these headphones and enjoy them out of the box. I was recently in a hardware store and a floor guy asked me if what I was wearing were Grado 225's. Turns out he's an occasional DJ and he worships these mothers.

Similar Products Used:

5th gen. ipod earbuds.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
[Sep 10, 2005]
twc644
Audio Enthusiast

Strength:

tight sound with increased dynamics

Weakness:

naturally the pads-a minor quibble tho

I've always been a headphone person and owned lower end models in the past 20 years.I finally broke down and purchased a pair of the sr-225's from Goodcans. Man, I'm in love with these for sure.Compared to the sr-80's of which I owned for quite sometime,these cans are definitely an improvement.Not saying the 80's were bad at all(perfectly content and suprised as well).I even noticed before a very short breakin they have a tighter more focused sound.The treble is not as bright. It's as if it's layered much more smoothly.The 80's were bright but tone controls solved that problem.Mids are smoother and exhibit more minor detail in music such as slight feedback or reverb depending on the recording.You can hear the vocalist inhale and exhale even.Base is not overpowering at all...just the opposite....no thump thump distorted sound here.Never with the 80's either.Better control with base in the 225's.I guess using a better copper for the windings,and having closer matched tolerances makes the difference from Grado website info.The Grado magic is here folks if your considering on purchasing them.This is my first foray into slightly higher end headphones.They definitely breathe life into an old recording and pull out some hidden details in your older cd's.Also,everyone complains about the pads.I personally have no major problem with them--they're light and comfortable to some extent.Not perfect by any means but close enough to warrant a better material for comfort.Still,the sound makes up for that minor gripe.I've always read here in Audio Review and various consumer reviews these are great rock"n"roll cans ! All those in favor of the 225's were not kidding.I feel like a 41 year old school kid with a new toy.Overall,these are a pleasure to own and helps me enjoy the music I love that much more.I still have not heard any modern day Sennheisers.What model Senns' are in close comparison to these ? I have always preferred headphone sound to any loudspeakers and Grado re-inforces that opinion that much more and then some to my ears.

Similar Products Used:

Grado Sr-80,old Sonys,old pair of Sennheisers back in '89

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jun 28, 2005]
bassdude
Audio Enthusiast

Strength:

Great value and an absolutely great sound quality, which exceeds all others for less than $500.

Weakness:

Some won't like the "classic" look, or won't consider them compact enough for jogging, or walking - those persons will probably prefer the Shure EC2 ear buds (which won't have the same bass emphasis, or the same open, airy sound). None of the Grado’s are as comfortable as the Sennheisers – but their sound makes up for it, although the SR225’s are more comfortable and lighter than the heavier SR325i’s, or RS-1’s.

Grado Prestige Series SR225 Headphones THE VALUE: I purchased the new Grado PS SR225 headphones on Ebay to use primarily with portable audio devices (I wanted audiophile sound quality at a good price), after trying the PS SR125’s and PS SR325i’s. At $160 (MSRP $195) these headphones are a great value. They have received rave reviews from many professional reviewers. As all the Grados, these headphones are also efficient, so most portable audio devices can drive them to reasonable volume levels with good sound quality, although their sound benefits greatly, from the use of a good amp. The features and performance of the SR225’s are the same as those of the SR125’s, but the SR225’s have 50% greater air flow that is achieved through the improved rear metal screen and more closely matched drivers. The result of these improvements is a bigger, tighter, more extended, more dynamic bass; less bright highs; and an enlarged soundstage achieved from closer driver tolerances, while the improved rear screen also frees the SR225’s from harmonic colorations. Since the SR125’s and SR225’s are identical except for these improvements, you may consider all the rave reviews of the SR125’s applicable to the SR225’s, as well – the SR225’s are everything the SR125’s are, and a lot more. THE SOUND: The sound of the SR225’s is very similar to the Grado SR125’s, and SR325i’s, as well as the RS-2’s, and even the RS-1’s, which all provide just about the best sound reproduction you can buy, for under $800+. In fact, some reviewers have described the SR 225’s as a “poor man’s RS-1.” The SR225’s provide exceptional resolution and detail across the entire audio spectrum, virtually unmatched by other headphones, except the Grado’s mentioned. The SR125’s have a lighter, and brighter sound, while the SR325i’s have a slightly more accentuated upper-bass, lower mid-range. The SR325i’s may sound a slight bit “heavy” in the lower frequencies, and the SR125’s and SR325i’s, both may sound a bit bright in the higher frequencies. Both are exceptional, with the SR125’s providing a slightly more detailed and accurate resolution, than the SR325i’s. In comparison, the SR225’s provide a sound which is a combination of these two other Grados, revealing every nuance of the recording and audio source. The SR225’s have a more extended and fuller bass than the SR125’s, more like the SR325i’s, but without the upper bass, lower mids emphasis of the SR325i’s; and they have the extended highs of the SR125’s and SR325i’s, but with a bit more warmth, and a bit less bright. Their sound is virtually identical to the RS-1’s, with just slightly less bass extension, slightly less delicate highs, and slightly smaller soundstage – but only very slightly – perhaps 5% less. The difference by no means justifies the $500 price difference of the RS-1’s. The SR225's provide the same precision resolution, clarity and detail of the all the Grados, which provide that "you are there, live" sound. The sound is full, warm, dynamic, open and airy with an excellent image. The bass is deep, tight, and clear with impact, and without the muddy boom, typical of lesser headphones. The mids are clear, well-defined, warm, and full. The highs are clear, crisp, well defined, and extended. With these headphones, you can hear all the nuances of the musical performance: the "rosin rasp of the bow" on the bass, or cello; and the fine texture and squeak of the fingers on the guitar or bass strings; the slap of the hand on the bass and the vibration of the strings; or the mellow aged timbre of the brass of the sax, or trumpet; the breath of the vocalist, and more - it is truly amazing, and virtually unequaled at anywhere near the price. As with the SR125’s, and SR325i’s, the overall sound tends to be a bit more analytical, than laid-back, warm and mellow - as I said, "it's detailed," giving you the impression, other's have correctly described, that you're "sitting right on stage" with the musicians. The image, or soundstage, is big and wide, but a bit smaller than the RS-1’s, or Senn HD600’s. As the reviewer said – they are truly are a “poor man’s RS-1” - you will never miss the extra 5% of the RS-1’s. And with the savings, you can get another truly exceptional value – the Shellbrook Audio Lab Maxi Moy portable amp to drive them (www.shellbrooklab.com). The combination of the Grado SR225’s with the Shellbrook Maxi Moy (upgraded to the Burr Brown OPA627 opamps), and a simple Sony Walkman CD player produces a truly exceptional “audiophile” sound for less than $400, which simply cannot be matched for less than $2000+. These observations were made using an upgraded Music Hall MMF CD-25 1+ CD player, and Musical Fidelity X-CAN v3 headphone amp; and the Grado RA-1 amp; as well as a Sony Walkman portable CD player, and Shellbrook Audio Lab Maxi Moy portable amp - after the headphones were “burnt in” with about 40 hrs of use.

Similar Products Used:

Bose Tri-Port Headphones (just for fun), Sennheiser HD600's+Cardas cable, Sennheiser HD 280 Pro's, Grado PS SR125’s, Grado PS SR325i’s, Grado RS-1’s, and various cheap Sony & Magnavox headphones and ear buds.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Apr 23, 2002]
springysing
Casual Listener

Strength:

awesome bass incredible separation of instruments and voices

Weakness:

soundstage not as wide or deep as i imagined

When I first brought it back, it sounded like all of the following: Harsh, Glassy,Busy, Confused, too much Detail in everything, in one word pretty Disappointing. I shelled out a total of usd 485 for the ra-1 and sr-225 combo and felt pretty stupid Left it on to play the burn in track from xlo/ Sheffield labs test disc. Next day, I rushed home from work. There were changes, bass is focused, tight, bass lines tuneful. Instruments around sounded more nicely balanced. After 3 says, In one word pretty awesome. Lets you get right into the music. With recordings from different eras, you know it immediately, reflecting the technology. Good recordings sound exactly like that. If it is cold it is. system: Sony cd discman de-j955--? mini to rca adapter --? qed qunex2--? grado ra-1----? grado sr -225

Similar Products Used:

sr-60 yamaha hp1 ear buds of various genres

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
[Apr 22, 2002]
Thomas
Audio Enthusiast

Strength:

Natural,detailed,you are close to the musicians

Weakness:

comfort,there are phones which sounds "nicer"

After listening to many headphones i decided to take you know which phone. You are able to discover your recordings completely new.You hear evry detail.These phones don"t want to imitate speakers like Sennheiser 600. Sennheisers have more bas more soundstage more effects.Sennheiser is good hifi.Grado is good music. The only thing thats missing-warm sounding voices.Perhaps thei are a bit too sharp.Good price for what you get

Similar Products Used:

Sennheiser hd600.akg501,sony 2000,

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Showing 1-10 of 31  

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