Music Hall A25.2 Integrated Amplifiers

A25.2

  • 50 watt/channel amplifier
  • High quality toroidal transformer
  • Specially designed low-noise pre-amp section
  • Pre-amp out/Subwoofer connection
  • Detachable power cord

User Reviews (7)

Showing 1-7 of 7  
wkas   Audio Enthusiast [Jan 11, 2008]
Strength:

Clarity, neutrality, soundstage.
Useful remote.

Weakness:

When you plug in the headphones, this turns off the speakers automatically. I consider this a flawed design; I had an NAD with this feature before, and when the tip of the headphone plug broke off and stayed inside the jack, the amplifier immediately turned into an expensive doorstop, since I couldn't find anyone to fix it for anything close to a reasonable price. If you're going to use headphones, be careful, or buy a headphone amplifier.

The sound could be a bit warmer.

It is what it is - a very basic, bare bones integrated that plays exactly what you feed into it - exactly what i wanted. No tone controls, no balance controls.

In combination with my speakers (Dali Ikon 6's), the sound is forward, with lots of presence and excellent soundstaging. No coloration whatsoever, and wonderful clarity and honest. Voices sound exactly like they're supposed to, as do instruments. Some would, however, consider the sound a little bright (this is certainly brighter than the Outlaw RR2150 that I replaced). The sound of the RR2150 was perhaps a little bit warmer, but not nearly as clear. The A25.2 has plenty of power for the Dali's, but they're pretty efficient and it's a small room.

A word about the remote. Although it isn't particularly robust, and looks a little bit cheesy, it does what it is supposed to do, and unlike the Outlaw, there are adequate steps at the low end of the scale so that one can find a comfortable listening level, whether using the knob on the amp or the remote control. That may be partially a function of the power ratings (50 W/ch for the A25.2 vs. 100 W/Ch for the Outlaw, but I think that it's a design thing, too.

Similar Products Used: NAD 325BEE
Outlaw RR2150
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Cee   AudioPhile [Aug 04, 2006]
Strength:

It sounds wonderful! I can't believe it's only $540.

Has cosmetic style.

Weakness:

Possibly in your face. Possibly weak bass.

Arcam A65 plus, some ~$300 Denon amp


Unlike purist audiophiles, I am not excited by incremental improvements. I want a large improvement and I want it to be cheap. Over the course of four years, I have slowly built up my modest ~$3k system. I occasionally go into high-end audio stores with CDs and listen to what I'm missing (which isn't a lot anymore) and try new products when I get the chance (If you haven't tried attenuators from your CD player to your amp, you're missing out). Of all the improvements I have made, this is BY FAR the best.

My previous amp, the Arcam A65 plus, I had thought was doing well. I was looking for what to upgrade next in my system and didn't think the amp was the weak point. At first I tried some CD players but the cost wasn't justifying the improvement they were making. I read the reviews here for the Music Hall A25.2, and did indeed go for the "test drive" the other reviewers suggested from AudioAdvisor.

There was no comparison. I had no idea that the harsh, rolled off highs were a result of the amplifier. I had assumed the CD player was to blame. I was hearing high frequency content in albums like Radiohead I had never heard before. The midrange, which I had thought was spot on, became like silk. CDs of Norah Jone's and Peter Gabriel's were just awesome to listen too, extremely involving. What the other reviewers say about the amp being musical is true. Also, I do like the look of this amp.

For potential problems, the bass doesn't seem deep enough. I've always been missing that last 10 Hz. However, I think that may be because of my speakers or CD player and not this amp. To the Arcam's credit, it was fast. High and low-frequency notes came noticeably quicker on music like Aphex Twin. But dwelling on it now, I don't think I miss it. This amp also has the potential to be a little more in your face. However, installing high-quality attenuators between the CD player and the amp took care of this problem.

This is a wonderful amp at the price. If you are looking for an amp in the $1k or less range, go to audioadvisor and try this puppy out.

Setup:
B&W 604 S3 speakers
Music Hall A25.2 amp
Denon DVD-2200 universal player (I can't wait to have $1-2k to upgrade this, the scanning buttons are completely bizare)
Monster HTS 2500 II power conditioner
LAT International interconnects, speaker wire, and power cable
Golden Sound Ceramic Toe Tips
Golden Jacks 10 dB Attenuators

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Cee   AudioPhile [Aug 04, 2006]
Strength:

It sounds wonderful! I can't believe it's only $540.

Has cosmetic style.

Weakness:

Possibly in your face. Possibly weak bass.


Unlike purist audiophiles, I am not excited by incremental improvements. I want a large improvement and I want it to be cheap. Over the course of four years, I have slowly built up my modest ~$3k system. I occasionally go into high-end audio stores with CDs and listen to what I'm missing (which isn't a lot anymore) and try new products when I get the chance (If you haven't tried attenuators from your CD player to your amp, you're missing out). Of all the improvements I have made, this is BY FAR the best.

My previous amp, the Arcam A65 plus, I had thought was doing well. I was looking for what to upgrade next in my system and didn't think the amp was the weak point. At first I tried some CD players but the cost wasn't justifying the improvement they were making. I read the reviews here for the Music Hall A25.2, and did indeed go for the "test drive" the other reviewers suggested from AudioAdvisor.

There was no comparison. I had no idea that the harsh, rolled off highs were a result of the amplifier. I had assumed the CD player was to blame. I was hearing high frequency content in albums like Radiohead I had never heard before. The midrange, which I had thought was spot on, became like silk. CDs of Norah Jone's and Peter Gabriel's were just awesome to listen too, extremely involving. What the other reviewers say about the amp being musical is true. Also, I do like the look of this amp.

For potential problems, the bass doesn't seem deep enough. I've always been missing that last 10 Hz. However, I think that may be because of my speakers or CD player and not this amp. To the Arcam's credit, it was fast. High and low-frequency notes came noticeably quicker on music like Aphex Twin. But dwelling on it now, I don't think I miss it. This amp also has the potential to be a little more in your face. However, installing high-quality attenuators between the CD player and the amp took care of this problem.

This is a wonderful amp at the price. If you are looking for an amp in the $1k or less range, go to audioadvisor and try this puppy out.

Setup:
B&W 604 S3 speakers
Music Hall A25.2 amp
Denon DVD-2200 universal player (I can't wait to have $1-2k to upgrade this, the scanning buttons are completely bizare)
Monster HTS 2500 II power conditioner
LAT International interconnects, speaker wire, and power cable
Golden Sound Ceramic Toe Tips
Golden Jacks 10 dB Attenuators

Similar Products Used: Arcam A65 plus, some ~$300 Denon amp
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
sappysappyman   Audio Enthusiast [Jun 19, 2006]
Strength:

Imaging, bass and midrange, looks

Weakness:

Only 1 set of speaker terminals

My budget narrowed my integrated amp choices down to Music Hall a25.2, NAD C320BEE, and Marantz PM7200. Of the three, the Music Hall is by far the best choice, Marantz is second, and the NAD third.

The a25.2 is a serious amp. It weighs about 21 lbs due to it’s massive power supply and can handle 2 ohm speakers. Its got a pre-out for a sub, but no input for an external pre-amp. There are no tone controls (which scared me at first- but I realized I never use them anyway) and a digitally controlled volume (it steps from 0-80). The digital control is great since you don’t get a hum from a cheap volume motor and the volume can be easily adjusted with the remote. There is only one set of speaker terminals. The amp runs super cool even when playing for 12 hours at moderate volume.

The Music Hall delivers nice clean bass, detailed mids, and great highs. When listening to the a25.2 on my Infinity Beta 50s (similar to Revel F12) the level of detail was stunning. I could definitely hear things in my music that could not be heard before. The mids are so solid its amazing. Vocals sound lifelike and crisp. Also, the bass is stunning, it makes my Infinities with their dual 8” woofers deliver more than an adequate amount of bass.

The Marantz PM7200 is a decent amp, but it runs way too hot for my taste (you can find this amp for $450). I’d be afraid that it cook all the circuit boards after about 2 years! (the length of its warranty). I also think it’s got a cheap power supply. The NAD is certainly better than an A/V receiver, but I think the bass is a little weak and it makes male vocals sound a bit chesty (you can find this amp for $380). Yes, the music Hall a25.2 is more expensive than both (you can find it for $540 if you search the internet), but it’s worth it.

Similar Products Used: Marantz PM7200, NAD C320BEE
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
blib blob   Audio Enthusiast [Jun 14, 2006]
Strength:

Clean sound, price, and looks.

Weakness:

One pair of speaker terminals.

My budget narrowed my integrated amp choices down to Music Hall a25.2, NAD C320BEE, and Marantz PM7200. Of the three, the Music Hall is by far the best choice, Marantz is second, and the NAD third.

The a25.2 is a serious amp. It weighs about 21 lbs due to it’s massive power supply and can handle 2 ohm speakers. Its got a pre-out for a sub, but no input for an external pre-amp. There are no tone controls (which scared me at first- but I realized I never use them anyway) and a digitally controlled volume (it steps from 0-80). The digital control is great since you don’t get a hum from a cheap volume motor and the volume can be easily adjusted with the remote. There is only one set of speaker terminals. The amp runs super cool even when playing for 12 hours at moderate volume.

The Music Hall delivers nice clean bass, detailed mids, and great highs. When listening to the a25.2 on my Infinity Beta 50s (similar to Revel F12) the level of detail was stunning. I could definitely hear things in my music that could not be heard before. The mids are so solid its amazing. Vocals sound lifelike and crisp. Also, the bass is stunning, it makes my Infinities with their dual 8” woofers deliver more than an adequate amount of bass.

The Marantz PM7200 is a decent amp, but it runs way too hot for my taste (you can find this amp for $450). I’d be afraid that it cook all the circuit boards after about 2 years! (the length of its warranty). I also think it’s got a cheap power supply. The NAD is certainly better than an A/V receiver, but I think the bass is a little weak and it makes male vocals sound a bit chesty (you can find this amp for $380). Yes, the music Hall a25.2 is more expensive than both (you can find it for $540 if you search the internet), but it’s worth it.

Similar Products Used: Maratnz PM7200, NAD C320BEEE
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
johnjohn   Audio Enthusiast [Jun 05, 2006]
Strength:

Transparent, musical, great soundstage. Gorgeous faceplate. Cool blue display! Remote resembles ones Marantz used on Reference Series CD players.

Weakness:

None for the price

This has got to be the best $500 amp on the market. Its sound rivals most solid state amps 2 to 3 times its price. Very rare in budget amps - it gets the midrange right! In direct shootout my twelve times more expensive Classe rig barely beat it out and mostly because of the bass. But for a 50wpc amp the low end is still excellent - tight and fairly deep. Its highs could be smoother, but in absolute terms it still outperforms most budget amps I've heard. Most under $1K amps are simply too much in your face. Incidentally I've never seen a more beautifully made faceplate on a $500 amp. The beauty is apparently more than skin deep - a peer inside reveals top quality parts neatly laid out and a hefty power supply - no wonder it weighs 24 pounds! If you didn't know the brand you'd think it's some exotic French or German design. Frankly I don't see how Roy Hall can price it so cheaply. I understand Shanling in China builds these to world class standards but kept the price low to build market share. If they keep this up they will succeed big time. I would give it 6 stars if I could. This one is a keeper!

Similar Products Used: Classe, Rotel, Arcam, Marantz
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Mosfetti   Audio Enthusiast [Feb 28, 2006]
Strength:

No particular strengths. Overall just one fine sounding amp that performs way above its price. It does look nice.

Weakness:

No phono section.

For all of you getting ready to pounce on the NAD C320BEE I suggest you check out this extremely impressive integrated. I owned the NAD along with the C352. If you like tubby bass and rolled off highs then those are for you. The A25.2 was designed to listen to the music...it sucks you right into the performance no matter what genre you're into. Sure, it has a spacious soundstage, is quite dynamic with deep and tight bass but once you listen you won't be listening for specific traits...just the music and that's what it's all about. Take my word for it but try it yourself. Pick one up at AudioAdvisor and listen for 30 days. If you don't like it return it within those 30 days and get a refund. Now you can't beat that!

Similar Products Used: Perreaux E160...Primare A20II...NAD C320BEE & C352...ARCAM Alpha 9...ROTEL RA-1070
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-7 of 7  

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