Bedini Ultra Clarifier Others

Bedini Ultra Clarifier Others 

DESCRIPTION

CD tweak

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-10 of 15  
[May 27, 2007]
Terry Pate
AudioPhile

Strength:

It works, don't ask me how.

Weakness:

The cheeziest construction I have ever seen. However, it got bumped around in shipping to me quite a lot, as the packaging was beat up, and it still works fine.

I bought this unit because of the reviews I read here and other websites. Everyone that has heard cd's before and after has heard a difference, some cd's seem to need treating more than others. For the price I paid this is the best investment I have made in my stereo.
I was playing my stereo for a novice friend and not treating the discs because I didn't think he would be able to hear the difference, he asked to hear a selection that I only had on a compilation burned disc. I played the selection and it sounded ok but not what I expected. I then announced that I was going to try some "snake oil" on the disc and would he please tell me if he heard any difference. I treated the disc on both sides as is suggested and popped it in the player. The difference was, I hate to use the word dramatic, but in this case it fits. Every aspect of the music improved: bass,depth of image and an added sense of realism.

I will not play a cd in my high end system again without treating it first.

Similar Products Used:

None

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
[Apr 20, 2003]
Mike Pulizzi
AudioPhile

Strength:

It works. So does a bulk-tape eraser. The Clarifier is safer to use though; the magnetic field surrounding a bulk-tape eraser is thought to be a contributor to certain cancers if used daily for years. The Clarifier works on a different principle.

Weakness:

Expensive. Ugly. (So what?) Audio is an obsessive hobby anyway.

To answer the "bits is bits" crowd I have to say that they are right. They are right, that is, until you have to convert back to analog and you factor in real-world power supplies and analog circuitry. I did some experiments with cd's to determine what the heck was happening. Turns out that no magic is involved. What is happening is that the disc takes on a static charge,either through spinning in dry air or just from handling. A spinning, statically charged disc is the definition of an electrostatic generator. This hash-like voltage is impressed on the laser-pickup circuitry. Of course the digital circuit ignores this noise (Well,not entirely. It does effect the jitter rather badly because of power supply noise.), but the noise is now impressed on the power supply and you can see the hash presented to the power-supply rails feeding the analog amplifier, and the cheap chips in most cd-players cannot reject this hash/noise. The better the power-supply and analog cicuitry the less effect this hash/noise and the clarifier has. No power supply built by man can completely eliminate this hash-voltage. It is best to stop it at its source. Hence the Clarifier. This tweak is actually an ANALOG tweak; the clarifier removes the static charge from the disc reducing the noise impressed on the power supply. Most all cd tweaks affect the player in the analog domain. Remember, the CD itself is indeed a digital storage medium, but the player is essentially an analog device right after conversion. (Hell, even before conversion. Its accuracy of conversion is dependent on a clean voltage from the power supply.) For an experiment, take your favorite cd and play it. Notice where in the image the high frequency stuff is (bells etc). Now take your disc and place it against a color tv picture tube when on (about 30,000 volts static charge while running). Now play it again. You will notice an enourmous degradation of sound. Now use the Clarifier (or a bulk tape eraser;start the erasor from about 1 foot,bring close to disc,hold near disc for about 20 secs,then move out to 2 foot before turning off,it works the same just not as convienient as the Clarifier). Now listen again. There should be a readily noticable difference in percieved noise floor and clarity on the highs. Tweaks like vibration damping, green ink, etc all work because the PLAYER is mostly an analog device; it just gets its initial data from a digital source.

Similar Products Used:

Radio-shack Bulk-tape eraser. Earlier model Clarifier

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
3
[Oct 25, 2002]
Bernd
AudioPhile

Strength:

Makes many CDs more pleasant to listen to and should be part of every serious system.

Weakness:

- Ugly - Cumbersome to use - probably too expensive

I am really stunned that so many people feel called upon to write a review on this product, despite the fact that they are apparently deaf or at least hearing impaired. To me it is easy to hear the difference between a treated CD and a virgin CD even while only casually listening. There are some CDs where the effect is less clearly but always easy to hear.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
3
[Sep 07, 2002]
Mark
Casual Listener

This is absolutely shocking to see so many people believing in this scam, and no single person pointing out a simple and trivial fact. Data on a CD is stored digitally, as zeros and ones, with checksums. It is either perfect reproduction (that may be affected only by the D/A conversion and amplifier, but not by the medium itself) or no sound at all. There's nothing in between. There are no better or worse zeros and ones. This is not an analog medium. For as long as reading is possible - i.e. there are no scratches or other damage - the reproduction is always identical, no matter how many magnets or other magic tricks you use. When there is any damage or dirt on the surface, some data cannot be read correctly, and the player just skips whole sector - something you'd hear clearly, not as a worse quality, but as, well, skipping. That's it. If you hear the music, you hear it exactly as it was recorded, you get a PERFECT copy. Same way, if you save a document on a floppy disk, as long as you can read it, it will be perfectly the same, letters won't change, move, "b" won't become "a". When the smallest piece of information, a single bit, becomes unreadable, you can't read a whole sector, you can't access your file anymore. It really does not hurt to think before paying some serious money.

OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
[Mar 05, 2002]
DMK
Audio Enthusiast

Strength:

Not a one unless you include the marketing!

Weakness:

Cheap plastic - an insult at the price.

Audio hype and mythology at its finest! Under blind conditions, I have yet to find the person that can hear a difference between a treated and untreated CD. The odd thing (or not so odd) is that many believe they hear a diff after they see a disc being treated! The mind and ear can definitely play tricks on a listener which is what Bedini is banking on with this product. No disrespect to the folks below who seem to truly believe this product is worth the money, but the world of audio is full of products who prey on people who become victims of the Barnum and Placebo Effects. I am having an enjoyable time testing the value of this product to people who don''t know if a disc is treated or untreated. I''m convinced that the person does NOT exist that can discern any differences if they are blindfolded. Don''t waste your money. If you''re looking for a way to improve the sound of CD, look into upsampling or SACD.

OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
[Mar 06, 2000]
Michael
Audio Enthusiast

I actually think this is a worthwhile product. I don't have the best system in the world, but I hear an audible difference. Definition improves, and much of the glare of CDs is curtailed, although not eliminated. I don't think I paid much more than $20-30 for this thing, and I use it frequently. Those of you who can't hear a difference, I accept your judgment. But my experience has been that many people do not hear what I consider to be fairly obvious differences between stereo systems.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
[Mar 15, 2000]
MP
Audiophile

If the depth and width of your soundstage, and instrument and vocal placement within the spatial field are important to you, then you should definitely acquire a Bedini Clarifier!

I have used it now for a month, and have noticed a dramatic difference in clarity on my older cd's, particularly those recorded in the era when Jethro Tull, Sqeeze, etc., did not have the studio capabilities that today's artists do. The music is actually a joy to listen to now, with a much clearer presentation! To use the much popular phrase..."the veil has definitely been lifted"!

On better recordings, the improvement is less dramatic, but, still very apparent. It's as though the clarifier "cleaned the window" between myself and the music. Details are cleaner and much more crisp, and timbre and feel have been enhanced. You can hear the difference the moment you listen to an A/B comparison.

I must relay to you though, that I have separate components and speakers that produce incredible sound. Annoyingly, the system identifies mediocre recording attempts of some studios, and almost makes a poor recording difficult to listen to above the level of background music. In the same manner, the system also magnifies the effect of the clarifier. I believe that the better system you have, the more noticeable the results will be.

In closing, I do not think that this product will enhance the listening experience for someone who is concerned about the price, as that ratio is probably a bit high in relation to the cost of your system. However, if you are a SERIOUS listener, the cost of the clarifier pales in comparison to what it will for your music. [for the same investment in a good pair of interconnects]

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Oct 14, 2001]
ROBERT DAVIES
Audio Enthusiast

Strength:

Worthwhile improvement in soundstage

Weakness:

It takes about 30 seconds to treat a disc - which has to be repeated before each play - though no worse than cleaning gramaphone records!

I was concerned when I saw the low overall rating of the product. Closer examination, however, revealed that one reviewer hadn't even taken the product home and another was using an older version (about which I can't comment). I have a high end Naim Audio System and a Nakamichi Mini System. On both the difference is significant, providing wothwhile improvements in the separation of instruments and clearer vocals. It is actually fun to let friends listen to a 'before and after' demonstration. I have yet to find anyone who couldn't tell a difference or who felt there wasn't an improvement in sound quality. This applies to both popular and classical music.

An additional benefit is the ability to clean cds with finger prints or dust using the Clarifier as a centrifuge. It effectively removes dirt without generating any static on the surface to attract dust.

I don't have any reservations in recommending the product . It is a bit pricey - and there may be cheaper alterrnatives that I haven't tried - but it does work and there are certainly a lot more expensive ways out there of trying to improve sound quality that deliver much less satisfactory results.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
[May 11, 2001]
Jerry
Audio Enthusiast

Strength:

Can make improvements to CD playback

Weakness:

The better your CD system, the less you may need this

I have used the Clarifier in all of its shapes and sizes, beginning in the mid-90s. The Clarifier can take a poor, spitty, hot, CD sound much smoother, less irritating. You have to know how to use it. CD label up, let the device do its work. Once it stops, turn the disc over and treat the label side. After it stops, treat the music side again. Carefully and slowly take the disc off the spindle and place in the CD player. Take a disc you are familiar with and listen to it untreated and listen to no more than three things within the music, such as the drum kit, bass guitar notes, room ambience. I have some CDs that are unlistenable without being treated; others are not affected as much. It is clear that this is a subjective enhancement, some discs need it, others can be played without it. Call Audition Audio 888-576-6823 for an instruction sheet.

Similar Products Used:

none

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
[Aug 16, 1999]
Harry Tan
an Audio Enthusiast

I must admit when I first decided to try out Bedini'd Ultra Clarifier, it was with much trepidation. What gave me the courage to eventually do so was the 30 day money back guarantee promised by the dealer.
Set it up, placed in a familiar CD (after having just played it), pushed the button (to start the spin cycle) and then popped in the CD again into the system. Lo behold ! There is a perceptible improvement (not difference) in the overall sonic of the CD. What is this improvement I heard ? Well, the highs are definitely sweeter (real nice decay noted on the triangle, better than before the treatment), mids are somehow warmer sounding and the bass tightened up.

If you ask me how did Bedini do it ? Well, quite frankly, I do not know. If you think that I may have fooled myslef to hear the difference (as opposed to improvement), I did get my wife and several other friends to listen to blind tests and each time they were able to pick out the treated and improved sound (to their ears)over the untreated one.

Its amazing but true. Try it out for yourself. You will be pleasantly surprised by the improvement it can actually make on your CD. Oh, by the way, I did not return my unit. Its here to stay.

5 for the fact it works, 4 for price (could be cheaper and therefore more affordable).

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
Showing 1-10 of 15  

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