Roku Labs M1000 Media Servers

4.33/5 (3 Reviews) MSRP : $250.00


Product Description

Roku Labs Soundbridge digital media player
  • Analog Stereo Audio Output
  • Optical Digital Audio Output
  • Coax Digital Audio Output
  • 10mbps Wired Ethernet
  • Wireless Network Support (Wi-Fi)
  • Wall/Cabinet Mount Option
  • Custom Remote Control
  • Decompression of Audio Data in Device Reduces Wi-Fi Bandwith
  • Large VFD Display - The M1000 features a 280x16 pixel display, for up to two lines of text.
  • Compact Body - 12 inches wide, perfect for a shelf, tabletop or nighstand.


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Reviews 1 - 3 (3 Reviews Total)

User Reviews

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Oktyabr a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: December 10, 2009

Bottom Line:   
Awesome head unit that gets it's real value from it's full compatibility with slimserver, both onboard DACs and the ability to use a separate one, and used, at a fraction of the price of a new Squeezebox.

First off, slimserver is the software I prefer. Open source and cross platform compatible it streams music to all the other computers in my house as well as my home stereo via the Roku Soundbridge. I buy most of music in CD form and then rip them to lossless .FLAC format to a dedicated harddrive. This preserves every nuance of the original recording and still allows the use of ID tags which raw .WAV do not. The Roku unit does not natively support the .FLAC format so I have the slimserver software transcode the files to 320kbps wavs which the Roku will play quite happily. This results in a solution which will easily play any of the over 10,000 high quality tracks stored on my (linux based) computer over my home stereo system. But it gets better!

Not only will the Roku play my local files but it also provides very capable search and browse functions for internet radio streams as well, somewhere around 12,000 different channels just in the USA. Other countries are of course also available. A feature found in the more recent versions of the slimserver software itself is to browse "Local" internet streams resolved from your IP address. In the Seattle area, for instance, this means that any FM radio station (and some AM ones too) that also broadcast on the internet (most of them) are as easy to access as pressing the search buttons on the FM tuner in my car! Added benefits of this is stream tags, telling you what station and in some cases even what song you are listening to and the clarity found with an internet stream. Many radio stations I can barely receive with a conventional FM antenna are now available to me, via this Roku unit. I don't even use the FM tuner in my receiver any more!

Superb value, especially when combined with slimserver. Would have given it five stars but it does not allow me to browse my music files and streams on my HDTV and the small LCD can sometimes be difficult to read from across my living room. There are several devices that WILL show music files on a television but I have yet to find one that works so well with Slimserver.

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Used product for:   3 Months to 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2004



Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:3
Submitted by swamitommi a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: February 8, 2005

Bottom Line:   
I use this product to stream WMA Lossless across my network. It will do a fine job, so long as your router is "compatible" with the Roku WiFi NIC (which mine was not), and you are running the computer wired to the router. For non-lossless music it does a fine job in all configurations. Sound is better than others - far better than Creative's offering. The DACs are nothing to shout about (and for $250 why should they be?) - so it requires an outbourd DAC for audiophile-grade sound. The (huge) upside is you can use one! - both coax and toslink digital outs are offered. Looks great. Easily best of breed - just bear in mind bandwidth limitations with WMAL. Make sure your songs are tagged correctly!

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Used product for:   Less than 1 month

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2004

Price Paid:    $250.00

Purchased At:   Fry's



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by DanielNTX a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: December 30, 2004

Bottom Line:   
I've been told that I've been very hard to shop for, because I'm very technology-centric and usually have the latest gizmos and gadgets. And if there is one item anyone could have given me for the holidays, it would be the recently introduced Roku SoundBridge M1000. It's simply an amazing and elegant device and I'm totally impressed with it. It's definitely built in mind of those music enthusiasts who have a lot of MP3's.

Some facts from the web site:
* Large VFD Display - The M1000 features a 280x16 pixel display, for up to two lines of text. Its "big line mode" displays your current selection in a large, 16-pixel sized font.
* Compact Body - 12 inches wide, perfect for a shelf, tabletop or nightstand.
* Available in Stores at: Best Buy (select locations), Fry's, Magnolia, Tweeter and at Rokulabs.com
* List price: $249.99

For years, I've wanted the TurtleBeach Audiotron ($399 and no longer made), but the price point was too high and the software was cumbersome. Then I heard of a better alternative called the SLIMP3 player made by Slim Devices. The SLIMP3 player was a first generation device and I thought it was ugly for the price. Recently, Slim Devices introduced their next generation device, the SqueezeBox ($279 with wireless option, $199 without). The Roku definitely looks the best out of all those products with its cylindrical shape and metal composite finish.

What makes the Roku so much better than the SqueezeBox is that it's compatible with iTunes out of the box (although won't play iTunes songs purchased because of DRM protection), uPNP Audio (Microsoft Windows Media Connect with support for WMA DRM protected files), Apple Rendezvous, Real's Rhapsody, Shoutcast radio streams and even Slim Device's own open source SlimServer (which powers the SLIMP3 & SqueezeBox players and enables playback of Ogg files) out of the box. The Roku was so very easy to setup. It comes with a wireless 802.11b Compact Flash card (made by Socket) so you can connect wirelessly or you can use the built-in ethernet port for wired use, a remote with batteries, an audio cable and a power adapter. It has digital optical and coax outputs that can pass 5.1 surrond sound as well as the standard stereo jacks. Anyways, I plugged it in and entered the key for my wireless network and it obtained an IP address and I was off and ready to go play music. I had the device check for new firmware and it updated itself within about two minutes. I easily navigated my library of music from my Windows XP box because I already had Windows Media Connect installed. My sister has an iTunes library on her laptop and I tested it with that and it also played with no problems. Next I tested the Roku out the SlimServer software. This is some really cool software that runs on PC, Mac or Linux. It even has a virtual SqueezeBox, called SoftSqueeze that lets you use the software to play MP3's from any computer that supports java. The Roku had no problems connecting to the SlimServer software and seeing the MP3's. Using a web browser you can pull up your list of songs through SlimServer via artist, album, genre and control the Roku to play music. If you have multiple Roku's you can also synchronize them to play the same music (useful if you want to play the same music in different rooms). SlimServer allows you to have plugins, so you can have it do different things. For example, you can use it as a caller ID display to broadcast caller info when there's an incoming call or even display RSS news feeds. Even if you don't have any music streaming device, I definitely recommend checking out SlimServer and using SoftSqueeze just to see how it works. I am utterly impressed with the Roku SoundBridge and give it a rating of 5 stars out of 5: *****. I think it's even more impressive than the iPod.

Roku also sells the M2000 which has a much larger VFD display (12 inches wide instead of 8) for $499.99 but is twice the price of the M1000 (you can buy two M1000's for just one M2000). Right now, the Roku M1000 retails at $249.99 on their web site and your regular brick & mortar retailers such as Tweeters, Fry's or Best Buy. I ended up getting the Roku M1000 for $179.99 through a special un-advertised promotion... Best Buy has the Roku for $199.99 through an instant store rebate of $50.00 (good through 12/31/04) and a printable 10% off coupon (good until 01/02/05) which saves another $20.00. For $179.00, it's an excellent deal. The Wireless Compact Flash card that comes with the Roku retails alone anywhere from $65-$90 and is even available at the Roku Store web site for $69.99.

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Used product for:   Less than 1 month

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2004

Price Paid:    $179.00

Purchased At:   Best Buy




Reviews 1 - 3 (3 Reviews Total)

Review Options:  Sorted by Latest Review | Sort by Best Rating


I got me a Roku M1000

I was gonna get a Squeezebox but at $300 I decided to do a little research first and see if there were many cheaper alternatives. I found the Roku M500 for $139 at newegg.com a few weeks ago but I was early into my investigation so held off a bit. I went to order it yesterday (Friday, February 17) ... Read More »

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