Marantz CDR500 CD Recorders/Players

4.17/5 (12 Reviews)


Product Description

Stand alone duplication, make perfect digital copies of CDs and CD-R/CD-RW discs without resampling through audio digital converters.

CD-text generation, create and edit track and disc titles with simple input controls. These titles are saved as CD-text that can be viewed on CD players and recorders that support the CD-text format.

Accepts multiple disc formats, the CDR500 accepts CD-R and CD-RW discs, including 1X-speed discs for computer use. This wider choice in media offers greater flexibility and additional cost savings.

Record level and balance control, the CDR500 offers both digital and analog record level and balance controls. This lets you easily control any input source and ensure that tracks on music compiliation discs share the same volume levels.

Selectable copy protection, bypass SCMS copy protection when duplicating a disc. Or set your own copy protection at the level you decide.


Review Options:  Sorted by Latest Review | Sort by Best Rating

Reviews 1 - 5 (12 Reviews Total) | Next 15

User Reviews

Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:3
Submitted by John B McLemore a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: April 2, 2012

Bottom Line:   
Since the last posting was three years ago, I decided to add my two cents worth. When I purchased my first one, I found it so intuitive that I immediately bought a Second one, And yes, this machine does not recognize the copyright protection code, it just writes right on, not ever knowing it was there.
Per previous reviewers, I agree that the propensity for this machine to fail is High. Within about 5 years, the Read head (on the right side) on one deck went out, and I just kept using the Write head, and driving this unit from my Denon mixer.
Well, the Write head on the other unit finally died quietly...it doesn't seem to matter if you use the damn thing or not, I probably never recorded more than 100 discs total between these two units within about 5 or 6 years.
Then I was left with 2 units, one with a dead Read drive, one with a dead Write drive.
It is now 2012, and the current situation is: One unit is suitable for a boat anchor, the other unit with the remaining Write head that functions works about 50% of the time. It seems to work best on dry sunny Summer days, never in Winter, and you have to keep feeding it discs over and over (sometimes the same discs), and if it ever gets past the NO DISC prompt, it will function correctly to the end of the disc every time.
I also had problems with the player with the defective Read head CUTTING OFF the last 2 minutes of discs sometimes. I contacted Marantz, sent the unit back, paid to have it repaired (when it was still considered repairable), and it returned with the exact same problem.
I would love to have both these repaired if possible, because they really were easy to use (or I wouldn't have bought a pair).
So my rating is about 5 stars for performance, and Zero stars for reliability. It seems that this machine had a self destruct timer built into the Phillips Drives the day it left the factory. Thus my middle of the road rating of 3 stars.

No one reading this review will be surprised to hear that this was my last Marantz purchase.

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2002



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:2
Submitted by audio-molasses a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: December 23, 2009

Bottom Line:   
This cdrecorder does what it is expected for: cdrecording and copying. Ive had this unit for more than 10 years and indeed...the recorder unit broke down halfway down its life on the laser part in the recorder section of the machine. I've managed to replace the drive unit from philips with a philips CDD4401/65 cdrom recorder for computers and it now works even better:D these laser units from the 4401 are better and last longer, and are really cheap-ass to replace (picked up one from a second hand shop for less than a dollar) if you know how to take apart consumer-electronics and replace parts, then i would strongly recommend you do so with this machine. dont get into replacement parts from marantz, they are scarse and waaaaaaaaay to expensive.
it is an exellent machine that reproduces sound really well, i've used it for over a decade and exept for the stock laser unit it IS a good machine. the recorder part is part plastic, but is die-cast iron there where the laser unit is assembled and solid as a rock.
So for all things clear: the drive units from the cdr500 and the cdd4401 are completely interchangable and work really well! the units from the cdd4401 are waaay better than the stock phillips 775 (i believe) found in the marantz, and last longer!
Because of the bad stock laser burner that came with it I give it a rating of 2/5 for value rating, and a 5 star for sound, mechanics, inputs and control:)

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   1998



Overall Rating:1
Value Rating:3
Submitted by PortlandSound a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: April 27, 2006

Bottom Line:   
Same problem as others have mentioned - drive broke and >surprise< no replacement parts were available. Near-criminal support from Marantz for pro gear and a pretty clear indication of bad product design. This is without question the last piece of Marantz gear I'll ever purchase. It's not worth the small initial cost savings to have to risk this kind of expensive failure.

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2001



Overall Rating:2
Value Rating:2
Submitted by Moyers a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: January 21, 2005

Bottom Line:   
I'm not going to go into too much detail about the " positives " of the CDR500. Prior reviewers have done a solid job of talking about all the things this unit does well and I agree with those reviews. However, what I do not like about the CDR500 is that Marantz used Philips drives which have the " known issue " of dying sooner than later. To make matters worse, these drives are hard to find and replace.....and there's no guarantee that they'll last. I used my CDR500 off and on for about 2-3 years.....hardly using it to record as much as I would expect a " professional " DJ or someone in a small studio would.........and my CDR drive died on me. And here's the fun part, it's a $500.00 fix to replace the dead drive and that's if you can find a replacement drive! For a " professional " piece of gear which has been used in a non-professional way(only about 80-100 hours of use).....that's a big let-down. Not too happy with Marantz on this one.
To justify that price, this unit needs some work in many areas. Maybe they corrected the mistake they made on the CDR500 in their replacement model(CDR510) by using different CDR drives? However, the doesn't solve my problem of owning a $600 CDR which now requires a $500 fix to make it more than just the sizeable paperweight it is now. Not cool Marantz. Where's the customer service on this unit?

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2001

Price Paid:    $600.00

Purchased At:   Hollywood DJ



Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by David K Nakamura a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: December 3, 2003

Bottom Line:   
This is a dual-deck pro-audio style CD recorder with the recording deck on the left side. It has rack mount holes and a wide-format rack-style front, but no rack handles installed.

The main differences between this deck and a standard consumer CD-recorder deck are:

1. SCMS defeatable function. Selectable levels of security. This feature ALONE would justify the price difference from a $300 consumer player;

2. Rear panel connects include the usual coax, toslink, and unbalanced stereo ins and outs for both decks... this deck also has balanced XLR inputs, but strangely, no XLR outputs. Rear connectivity is almost exception except for this fact.

3. Kindy klugey, big, clunky and primitive remote. Obviously OEM, as coincidentally, this remote operates another Onkyo CDR deck that I owned, as well as the Onkyo's remote fully controlling this one.

4. Drive drawers are somewhat flimsy-feeling for a supposed "pro" deck. These drive drawers and probably the mechanism and many other parts are OEM parts for consumer decks. Makes sense, and one can't complain for the price.

5. Yes, there is a noisy fan that goes on during recording. I actually consider that a blessing, as this unit is clearly designed for heavy use. That fan keeps internal temps down, and everybody knows that nothing deteriorates parts faster than excessive heat.

6. Relative ease-of-use. The front controls are a bit small (small buttons, very small jog dial), but the menus are simple and the operation buttons large, clearly marked, and color coded. This is not a sumptuous machine, but more of a purposeful workhorse. It looks like it would be more at home in a studio or a rack full of equipment than perched atop a home stereo system.

Overall, this is a very good product, and great for the price. The sound is good, though I might just get better CD playback out of my Sony ES SACD changer. For most copy purposes, it's easier and much faster to burn copies on my PC (especially if it means selecting specific tracks). However, and the final major selling point of this deck might just be this: according to my friend who also bought one at my recommendation, this deck supposedly will record from the new copy-protected CDs !! If that's true, then that makes this deck that much more of a great product.

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   1999

Price Paid:    $800.00

Purchased At:   Leo's Pro Audio




Reviews 1 - 5 (12 Reviews Total) | Next 15

Review Options:  Sorted by Latest Review | Sort by Best Rating



SFLAT:



Axiom Audio: