Marantz SR-7000 A/V Receivers

4.62/5 (240 Reviews)


Product Description

The Marantz SR-7000 Digital Surround. The Marantz SR-7000 incorporates the most advanced digital technologies including Dolby Digital and DTS decoding and 96/24 audio capability. 100 watts x 5 channels.


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Reviews 1 - 5 (240 Reviews Total) | Next 15

User Reviews

Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by billpong a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: April 15, 2006

Bottom Line:   
First of all. I like this receiver. It is the last portion of Marantz products that are made in Japan. Very good material and "feeling", as well as the quality.

Soundwise, it is right there where I've expected. Not too much beyond the money, but no doubt the best choice in the range. The sound is warm and detail, maybe a little on the soft side for some guys who want straight step response for an explosion in a movie. I think quite a few of you buy this because you care about music--two-channel MUSIC instead of surround. In that category, it beats most of the competitors in the price range. It has clean transparent sound as well as a good image. Instrumental music sounds good, but little lack of juice on vocals. I have to mention the DAC of it, it clearly beats the famous Burr-Brown 20bit DAC in my NAD c521. Of course, it's 24bit/96kHz processing inside, which agrees with the theory. It does have a great pre-amp section, but not all that perfect. I connect it to my ATI 1505, and there is quite a bit of noise comes out, even no source is connected. Maybe it's just a problem of my receiver. The SONY TA-9000ES doesn't have that. Another great thing about this receiver is it has a Source-Direct mode, turn that ON!! The sound field is twice as large and deep as it's OFF!

Lastly, a little personal experience on the bass management. If you manually turn the mode to Stereo, the sub-woofer will turn on automatically, just press the number 8 in the remote, and no matter the main speakers are set to big or small. This is not available in source direct mode though.

Also this is just a regular home theatre receiver, not a Krell or Mark Levinson, we have to consider its driving capability. For people saying they have to turn it very loud to get real volume, they better check their speakers' sensitivity. It is not the receiver's fault. If you're using 85dB or 86dB sensitivity speakers, like Dynaudio or Monitor Audio small bookshelves, you probably need to turn the volume really high to get a volume, but if you switch to a 90 or 91dB ones, like a Genesis or B&W floorstanding, you will feel your ears are popping.

Finally, yes, the manual is confusing and the remote is hard to use.

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Used product for:   3 Months to 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2000

Price Paid:    $300.00

Purchased At:   ebay



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Ray479 a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: December 18, 2004

Bottom Line:   
I wasn't looking at Marantz until I heard the 7000. What an amazing receiver.The sound in very impressive for an entry level product. This unit powers my Vandersteen system with ease. I've owned the 7000 for over 2 years with no regrets. The detail is incredible and the impact from movies is awsome. I've heard more than one home theater that costs 5 to 10 times what I paid and mine hangs right in there with them. I know this unit has been replaced in the Marantz line, but anyone looking at a used one should grab it quickly.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2001

Price Paid:    $500.00

Purchased At:   Stereo Unlimited



Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Drew a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: June 20, 2003

Bottom Line:   
I just picked up my SR-7000 last night (June 2003). The unit was brand new in the box, but sat on the shelf of the local audiophile shop for 2+ years. My original plan was to buy the 2003 Marantz SR-4300, but the only advantage it had was 6.1. I don't have a center rear so I opted not to get it because the SR-7000 did offer more power/channel, better circuit architecture (so i'm told...that might all be BS), and on-screen menus. Oh, and the SR-7000 has a slightly better looking front panel (only noticeable when they’re sitting side by side) and it has a true aluminum front panel and copper plated chassis, where the 4300 has a steel chassis (no Cu plating) and a plastic front panel with a metal foil appliqué.

I'm well versed in home audio, primarily stereo and mono-block, so this was my first personal foray into home theater. I've resisted for a long long time because I like listening to music, and while movies are great I don't own many at all (less that 10), and I have a cheap little TV. However, as a near my college graduation date I figured it was time to step up a little...frankly I was just a little bored with my old Marantz dual mono setup. So, after hours of reading reviews, searching old and new product brochures, and listening to every conceivable system that was in my price range on speakers similar to my own I bought the Marantz SR-7000. I watched parts of 5 or 6 movies last night, and it was pretty neat. Since I have a junky little TV some of the wow-factor was lost, but it was still pretty awesome.

My system includes: B&W DM303s (about 6 months old), B&W LCR 3 (Purchased with SR-7000), Paradigm Titans (Rev. 3, 1998), and a Velodyne CT-100 (made in the last month of production with the CT-120 amplifier). I have a Pioneer PDR-555RW CR-R(W) unit (1999), a Pioneer DV-626D DVD player with onboard DTS decoding (2000, multi-region upgrade 2001), and a Nakamichi OMS-5 analog CD player (1984, resistor ladder upgraded in 1987).

First, a word of praise for all three of the B&W Speakers. WOW. Although the 3-series is on their lower end, these speakers are amazing. I have a pair of their much bigger brothers (Nautalis) in storage waiting for the college experience to and apartment life to be ovr with, but the 303s are GEMS in terms of frequency response. The lack some sensitivity on my 6L6 7-Watt valve monoblocks, but the 7000 pushes them around very nicely and overcomes the perception of low sensitivity. Paradigms “bookself” speakers are awesome for the price too, but the high frequency response or staging or whatever you want to call it isn’t as alluring as the 303s. The CT-100 has new life behind the 7300 too. I have to give my hapinstance combination of LCR3, DM-303, and Titans an A+ for home theater in a SMALL semi-reflective space (2 bedroom townhouse apartment with acoustically softened walls, read: “perforated paneled walls”). I was shocked how good this setup actually sounded.

Even music (two channel) sounds greats. Not as natural as a valve amplifier, but still very pleasant. I could easily get by with JUST the 7000 A/V unit. But, since I’ve already got various other mono-blocks that I choose to use for stereo, I won’t get rid of them.

That brings up on of the nicest features on the 7000: The Pre-Outs. It illustrates what a transparent pre-amplifier stage the unit has. I could tell NO difference between the 7000’s pre-amp stage and my favorite NAD preamp. I think Mr. NAD preamp is getting hawked on eBay next week. Sure, the 7000 sounds different than a valve preamp (duh!), but it’s a great solid state preamp…very musical.

Many people have complained about the bass management of the 7000, but thus far I’ve noticed no problems. Granted, all of my speakers are inherently set to “Small” in the onscreen setup (which the manual explains will effect the crossover point and subwoofer attenuation), which noted on this list alleviates some of the problems.

As for the remote and manual, I had no problems. I programmed the remote with the basic features I wanted from 3 other remotes in about 10 minutes. The manual used a lot of home theater buzz words, interlaced with a few (perhaps) “technical” words, but nothing too hard to follow.

Overall, I continue to be very impressed with Marantz, even though I bought a receiver/amp/whatever that’s already a couple/few years out of prime. I think I’ll be happy with it for 4 or 5 years to come, and perhaps longer.

If you’re looking for an A/V amp, and you have an ever-evolving stereo/theater system, and can still find an SR7000, new in box: BUY IT. What a nice piece of kit.

Anyone know where I can get the Champagne colored chassis? ; )

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Used product for:   Less than 1 month

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2001

Price Paid:    $400.00

Purchased At:   Ideal Acoustics



Overall Rating:2
Value Rating:2
Submitted by jeff Ditton a Casual Listener

Date Reviewed: January 25, 2003

Bottom Line:   
I purchesed this reciever thinking I would get an awesome home theater experience. I was very wrong. In Dolby Digital it sounded ok but I had to turn it up loud to get any real volume. I like my action movies loud and this reciever had no power at all. I also tried 2 channel stereo and even then i had to max out the volume for any real loudness... I was very disapointed. Also there was poor bass management. Definately not worth that kind of money.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Casual Listener

Product model year:   1999

Price Paid:    $750.00

Purchased At:   Lehman Electronics



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by David Glass a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: November 23, 2002

Bottom Line:   
In my opinon the SR7000 is the best sounding reciever in it's price range.I was looking at the SR19 but couldn't afford it so I bought the 7000.I plan to add the MA-500's at a later date. My System is as follows: SR-7000
Mirage 890's
" 190's
" Subwoofer
" MC-3

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2000

Price Paid:    $1000.00

Purchased At:   Great Met Sound




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