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Grado SR225i
31 Reviews
rating  4.48 of 5
MSRP  200.00
Description: The SR225s sound unlike any other headphone. They have an amazingly solid presentation, packed with weight and presence. There is also a pleasant richness in the midrange that benefits all types of music


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Reviews 1 - 5 (31 Reviews Total) | Next 15

User Reviews

Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:2
Submitted by Merid Levin a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: November 4, 2013

Bottom Line:   
Eventually the upper-mids and treble became too much to bear. At first blush they sounded great, but then they wore on me. They also became very uncomfortable after 30 minutes or so. You need to sit with them for a while and experience the fit before buying. I guess you could spend more money on new aftermarket pads, but then why buy them just to tweak around.

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Used product for:   1 to 3 months

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2010



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Stuart M a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: July 6, 2011

Bottom Line:   
The whole Grado Prestige line-up share a very similar "sound" - it is worth noting that if you intend use with an MP3 player or other such device, you may aswell stick with the SR60. The SR-225 is a fabulous headphone but it really is best used with top electronics - expect disappointment from cheap sources! They sound pretty good out of most amps although a top source is a must.

Very important to note is that my 225's are now no longer in stock form. I have replaced the cups with larger cups (gives nicer tone) and have removed both the front and rear dustcovers. I also fitted Sennheiser 414 pads which are super comfy and sound spot on. I tried a set of quarter-modded 414 pads but they're not as good as stock!

If a friend asked me what headphones should he/she buy for general use, I'd tell them a Grado SR60. If they were interested in more serious listening, I'd say an SR225 - the only "sensibly priced top headphone" that is listenable from a portable too.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2004



Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:3
Submitted by Phil Canard a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: November 24, 2007

Bottom Line:   
I once used Grado and Sennheiser headphones. My Grado headphones would get irritating, then I would switch to the Sennheisers and get a bit bored. I now use top model AKG and Beyerdynamic headphones, and am not looking back. I owned and listened to several of the SR series Grado cans, and they all have a family sound. AKG K601 or K701 will get you better mids and keep the dynamic nature. Beyerdynamic DT880 gets you better treble and more extended bass. Either will be far more comfortable in long listening sessions. There is no accounting for taste, so some peopele are going to put up with and even prefer Grado headphones. This isn't 1991 anymore, and the headphone world has changed for the rest of us. Grado neeeds to update their comfort level, build quality and sound response curve if they want to compete as a refined headphone. They sound is now seen as in the rowdy rebel camp, and that appeals to some at first. Then you get the headphones home and get to know them over time. Perhaps some ears need the exaggerated response curve of Grado, but I would advise you to listen to some of the top new models by Audio Technica, AKG or Beyerdynamic before buying Grado. Sennheiser is normally too laid back for me, but I would still take them over Grado over the comfort issues. The other four companies I named build most of the pro microphones used by recording studios. Grado does not. They do not have the capability to compete in that camp. The other four companies can design headphones at reasonable prices that more properly reproduce what the microphone picked up, and that is why you will see many more of them than Grado in a recording studio. Many feel that Grado headphones give a colored sound, and I agree. If the coloration sounds good to you, then OK.

Grado headphones are sort of an EQ control for audiophiles who think EQ controls on their equipment are no good. If so, then buy Grado and have fun. The rest of use can buy a DT880 or K701, add a midbass hump and more low treble emphasis with a graphic equalizer, and get a similar sound to Grado while having more comfort and better soundstaging.

Grado Prestige series headphones are now really quite mediocre. Trends often continue past their useful era. Some people no doubt prefer carburetors to fuel injection. I keep my old SR60 as a backup, but rarely use it.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2002



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by ebroyles a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: May 3, 2007

Bottom Line:   
As a headphone connoisseur, I have had the opportunity and privilege to listen to some of the best headphones (Stax, Audio-Technica, AKG, Sennheiser, Sony, etc.) in the world. Based on my listening experience, Grado’s SR-225 is the best MP3 player Open headphones to listen to music to in the world. The quality of the treble and bass tones is very vivid, clear, and alive to the listener ears. With is plug and play capability, after using a 1/4 to 1/8 plug converter, the SR-225 requires no headphone amp to enjoy it its full capability. John Grado of Grado’s Lab has succeeded again at delivering a product beyond it time in quality, utility, usefulness, and value. Just think, this is only the beginning of a wonderful relationship with music.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2006

Price Paid:    $200.00

Purchased At:   BH Photo



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by Eric Broyles a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: May 3, 2007

Bottom Line:   
As a headphone connoisseur, I have had the opportunity and privilege to listen to some of the best headphones (Stax, Audio-Technica, AKG, Sennheiser, Sony, etc.) in the world. Based on my listening experience, Grado’s SR-225 is the best MP3 player Open headphones to listen to music in the world. The quality of the treble and bass tones is very vivid, clear, and alive to the listener ears. With its plug and play capability, after using a 1/4 to 1/8 plug converter, the SR-225 requires no headphone amplification to enjoy it its full capability. John Grado of Grado’s Lab has succeeded again at delivering a product beyond it time in quality, utility, usefulness, and value. Just think, this is only the beginning of a wonderful relationship with music.

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2006

Price Paid:    $200.00

Purchased At:   BH Photo




Reviews 1 - 5 (31 Reviews Total) | Next 15

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