Toshiba SD1700 DVD Players

2.35/5 (51 Reviews) MSRP : $229.00


Product Description

· 10-bit 27mHz Video D/A Conversion with High Resolution Filter · ColorStream® Component Video Outputs · Enhanced Picture Modes · Horizontal Resolution: 500 Lines


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Reviews 1 - 5 (51 Reviews Total) | Next 15

User Reviews

Overall Rating:1
Value Rating:1
Submitted by TMax a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: January 10, 2006

Bottom Line:   
Like the others here, I had the sound problem with this unit. I just wanted to write and clarify some things and to also note how I did my repair without completely removing the board. I also wanted to thank Kip for his repair tip, without which this unit would have been useless to me.

I was given this unit by a friend who had been given it by a co-worker who said it worked but "was too complicated" for her. I first set it up for my friend about a year ago, which was probably 6 months or more after she had received it (maybe longer). Anyway, I set it up for her ~September '04 and it seemed to work fine. She didn't want me to leave it set up for her, so after that "test" it went unused for ~ 8 months until this past summer when she used it briefly to watch a wedding DVD. Again, it seemed to work fine, although the sound may have been a bit soft. She gave the unit to me shortly thereafter (this past summer), but I didn't try to use it until about a week or so ago. When I did, I found that the display on the unit no longer worked and the sound was definitely soft. I'm quite sure the display worked fine the first time I used it and again this past summer for the wedding DVD.

I had researched the unit right after setting it up for her initially and saw Kip's fix and the other reviews on the sound problem. But it wasn't until this time around that I started to get the feeling that maybe the display and the sound problem were related. That is indeed the case as I now know both from further research and from my own fix tonight. Because once I swapped out the capacitors, the display returned (yea!).

I bought the caps (100 microfarad @ 35 volts) at Radio Shack (part # 272-1028) for $1.29 each. My local electronics supply store would probably have charged me 10 cents each but the gas for the trip there wouldn't have warranted it. Radio Shack was out of desoldering braid, which also bugged me AND made the fix considerably more difficult. Maybe I should have just driven the extra distance to my supply store. I KNOW they have everything!

The main board has 5 or 6 wire connectors on it which have to be removed in order to remove the board from the unit. I couldn't figure out how to remove any but the largest one and I didn't want to break the others, so I removed the largest one and that allowed me to lift the board up and "out" sufficiently so that I could work on the underside of it (the caps are clearly marked on the underside). That is, after turning everything upside down and properly supporting things, yada yada. I carefully removed the old caps by heating from the underside and gently prying and pulling on the caps from the top until they eventually came out. The resulting holes weren't holes at all because they filled back up with solder because I had no wire braid and a solder sucker was useless. So to put the new ones in I just located the longer (positive) lead over it's hole and (again) heated from the underside with the iron until the solder melted and the wire came through. I held the board against my chest in an "upright" position for this maneuver so that I could have access to both top and bottom with my hands, etc. A helper would have been nice for the job but I had none. If you have one, I'd suggest a helping had to hold the board in position. Anyway, I then did the other wire lead the same way. Out of the 6 wires for the 3 caps, all but a couple came through so that they were still loose enough to simply finish by pushing the caps down fully into position before soldering them in place. The leads that didn't come through "loose" had to be heated (again from the bottom) so that the cap could be pushed down into position. Do one lead at a time as necessary. Although I doubt it's really necessary to push them "down into position" for the repair to work, I made the effort.

So now the unit works properly. The sound is good and the display works again. NOW, I'm concerned about the power supply problem. I suspect it's a "surge" problem when the unit is plugged in or turned on. Does anyone who's knowledgable have a mod suggestion for this? I'd hate to have the power supply go out now that I went to the trouble of modding the other problem. How about something like a switched resistor in the power line to feed the unit less than full voltage at first, and then switch to feed full voltage (the resistor is bypassed)? Would that work? How about a capacitor?

Last thing on this unit and these problems and my history with the unit: The owner's manual notes at page 8 that: "If you do not use the DVD video player for a long period, the unit may not function properly in the future. Turn on and use the DVD video player occasionally."

That sounds a tad strange to me but could explain why my unit worked at first but then didn't work after lying around idle for quite some time. I'm just glad that I didn't pay anything for this unit because it obviously has LOTS of issues.

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Used product for:   Less than 1 month

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2001



Overall Rating:2
Value Rating:1
Submitted by blair7985 a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: September 30, 2004

Bottom Line:   
Saw the fix on this forum. I bought 3 50 Volt 100 microfarad caps (Actually the local radioshack gave them to me with the purchase of a soldering iron) and replaced C 927, 928, 929 with the bigger caps. I didn't use a desoldering tool, although it would make things a lot easier. I fixed the audio problem for a friend and it works good after about 25 minutes of testing.

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Used product for:   1 to 3 months

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2001

Purchased At:   N/A



Overall Rating:2
Value Rating:3
Submitted by Kip a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: November 3, 2003

Bottom Line:   
First thing's first. This player, among others afterward, had what I consider the wrong kind of capacitors installed on C927, C928, C929.

The original caps are rated with a filtering range at 100 microfarads with a tolerance of 16 volts. The fix is to replace all three caps with the new set having the same filtering range, but a higher voltage tolerance that is at least 25 volts. I use 35 volt/100 microfarad caps myself just to ensure that the problem will not happen again.

To properly do the fix, you need a 30 watt soldering iron, desoldering braid, and a quality rosin core solder. With the right tools and proper repair training and experience, repair time usually takes less than 20 minutes. The board must be removed from the player, which means disconnecting the cables connected to the mainboard and undoing all screws that mount the mainboard to the player chassis (don't forget the screws on the backside of the player that secures the A/V outputs to the rear). After that, you take the entire mainboard out of the player. You then carefully desolder the leads to C927, C928, and C929. After all the solder has been removed, you pull the old caps out. Then you stick the new caps in, making sure the caps are installed correctly and in correct polarity. You then solder the joints and snip off the excess posts on the new caps. You reinstall the board, screw it back on, plug the cables back in, and then plug the player to the power outlet and check to see if it works.

The soldering must be done carefully as the mainboard is multi-layered and is easily damaged if you are careless with the handling of the board and/or using the soldering iron.

I've fixed many of these players and not one has come back for this problem when I replace the caps with a set better suited to their tasks.

Now, on to the review.

This player, when properly working, is a very decent machine. Very good picture and sound quality, although this machine has a big problem with excess edge enhancement. The Sony players have a more refined and natural picture than the Toshibas, but the Toshibas are nowhere near as bad as Pioneer players usually are when it comes to excess edge enhancement.

Edge enhancement artificially boosts the sharpness of the picture, usually giving the picture a less natural look. This artificial sharpness is not true resolution and also shows up as ringing on a scope when the video signal is analyzed.

This player uses the Zoran Vaddis IV chipset. It's a decent chipset, but it has a problem with chroma upsampling. This problem usually goes unnoticed by the majority of people out there, so this may or may not prove to be a problem. It depends on the quality of the video equipment you are using this player with.

This player does not have an optical output, so people with various Technics surround receivers may not be able to connect this player to the receiver without an interim device to convert the coaxial signal into an optical signal.

One thing that has bugged me about this player is that it is pretty much useless without the remote. You can't just press PLAY on the player itself in a DVD menu and expect it to play the movie. You'll need the player remote to navigate the DVD menu and get it to start a movie. Something to consider if you are wanting to buy this player used without a remote as replacement remotes for this model go up to $35 sans shipping charges if purchased new from an authorized Toshiba parts source.

This player does not have a dual-wave laser, so playing a CD-R with this machine will not be possible. There are no mods to make ANY player that couldn't read CD-Rs before read CD-Rs now.

This player does not have the capability of playing VCDs. A VCD is a CD-ROM which contains standardized MPEG video for up to 70 minutes. Most DVD players can read these discs, and such players can be identified when the words "DIGITAL VIDEO" are underneath the Compact Disc logo. If the words "DIGITAL AUDIO" are underneath the logo, then chances are the player does not have VCD support. In the case of the SD-1700, it's "DIGITAL AUDIO" and true to this description, no VCD is playable on this particular model. This was probably done to reduce the cost of the player as adding VCD capability means Toshiba must pay a licensing fee to add it to this player, which would only increase the retail price.

This player is okay when the cap fixes are applied. When the fixes have been performed, this player is usually a reliable workhorse that performs its basic functions with aplomb.

Despite its shortcomings, it's still a very decent player and is very ideal for basic, non-critical applications, such as a DVD player for the kids. That is, when it has the capacitor update installed.

However, if you can't properly install the caps yourself and must hire a repairman, you may want to consider a replacement. Repair costs will exceed the value of the player if taken to a shop.

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   3 Months to 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2001



Overall Rating:1
Value Rating:1
Submitted by PJ a Casual Listener

Date Reviewed: August 1, 2003

Bottom Line:   
The Toshiba SD-1700 DVD Player as many before me have stated is "pure junk." I've not used it all that much, perhaps 10-12 movies in the time that I've owned it. From the beginning I had issues with prolonged freeze frame(s) then nothing, no picture or sound at all...absolutely nothing and none of the other features worked anymore either. The unit needs a cool down period in-between these breakdown cycles. If you see this unit for sale or on sale run away as fast as you can. Go to the movies, believe me it would be more entertaining and less frustrating. Toshiba, shame on you…. now, how about a recall??? Sorry to say this but no more Toshiba products are welcome in this household.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Casual Listener

Product model year:   2002

Price Paid:    $179.00

Purchased At:   Best Buy



Overall Rating:1
Value Rating:1
Submitted by pissed a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: July 27, 2003

Bottom Line:   
I bought the sd1700 and had the typical frame freeze...not a big problem. One day out of the blue it stopped working completly about 6 months after the date of purchase. Out of warrantee and pissed I bought another sd1700 opened it up and swapped the bad power supply board (the problem) with a good one and returned the bad one to ??. After a month of use the new power supply board died as well. Now thats what I call some serious Bull "S". Ever heard of quality or building trust with customers toshiba? "F" you Toshiba!!! I WILL NEVER BUY YOUR CRAP AGAIN!!!!!

Expand full review >>

Used product for:   3 Months to 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2002

Price Paid:    $88.00

Purchased At:   mart




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