VPI HW-19 Jr. TurnTables

4.42/5 (19 Reviews)


Product Description



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Reviews 1 - 5 (19 Reviews Total) | Next 15

User Reviews

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:4
Submitted by Santaduck a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: May 27, 2005

Bottom Line:   
I originally got the HW19 Jr used, with mk3 springs (but not plinth nor platter), with a Grace arm and nuded Grado cart. Honestly, was disappointed, and in retrospect the sound overall was not always more enjoyable than digital (cambridge audio tran/dac). Wow/flutter & motor noise was a big issue, although I didn't really pin it down to that at the time; I just wasn't satisfied. Later bought a used mk3 platter ($50), and the heavier mass really helped stabilize the w&f, the difference was night & day. Before it was almost unacceptable (for analog), but now it finally sounded legitimately 'audiophile', noticeably more enjoyable than digital. Later changed the arm to a Rega RB250 (mod: counterweight, cardas wiring) and it started to sing, since the Grace was the wrong compliance type of arm for the cart. A few years later I bought a new SAMA ($500) motor assembly-- I had my doubts especially b/c the price was almost as much as what I paid for the used table, but they were wholly erased after hearing the incredible differences. I would almost say to MK3 owners to upgrade to a SAMA first before going to a mk4, it was really unbelievable-- taking out the motor noise brought in scads of presence, not slightly artificial like digital, but just really there. VPI has discontinued the series, and I managed to get a MK3 plinth from their last production run (nicer sound, but not even an order of magnitude of a difference to that made by the mk3 platter, and later the SAMA). MK4 is not practical for me at this point, but I'll be considering the older or newer PLCs... at this point the analog is fantastic for my budget, and anything significantly better is simply a fantasy purchase due to cost. The upgradeability of this product really paid off. Also: using the clamp from a TNT, van den hul The First carbon interconnects, and the table is sitting on a home-made innertube air cushion. Experimenting with support (feet, platforms) is essential.

All in all, for the price of a used unit, it's probably a good deal, but you may be unsatisfied with a stock jr., so if that's your purchase, it would be worth auditioning other entry level (e.g. Music Hall) tables, unless you're getting a MK3 platter or better.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Price Paid:    $700.00

Purchased At:   audio directions



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:4
Submitted by Philco50 a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: February 4, 2005

Bottom Line:   
Excellent for the money. When you throw away the cheap rubber feet and install some tone cones and set the unit on a very stable platform, it really opens up and lets you hear the recording acoustics. Th enoise floor drops drastically and lets through a lot more low level detail.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   Pre 1995

Price Paid:    $950.00

Purchased At:   VPI Dealer



Overall Rating:5
Value Rating:5
Submitted by rudedog73 a AudioPhile

Date Reviewed: August 11, 2003

Bottom Line:   
You cant find a better TT for the money, Period!! Its totally upgradable to levels that rival even the most expensive tables in the world! I got the MKIII platter and Rega RB300 tonearm and Clearaudio Virtiouso Wood cartridge, and it is just AWESOME sounding! Get one dont wait for any other table you can upgrade these tables to the hilt. The table by itself is awesome right off the bat, so if you upgrade they say it will get 10% better than its stock form. This is really a wonderful surprise for what you have to spend, to get super Hi-end sound! Get one and see for yourself!!

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Used product for:   3 Months to 1 year

Duration Product Used:   AudioPhile

Product model year:   2002

Price Paid:    $1800.00

Purchased At:   Hi-End Audio



Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:3
Submitted by Rick Harrison a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: September 7, 2002

Bottom Line:   
The system I bought is a VPI HW-19 Jr. with a AudioQuest PT9 tone arm and a Shure Vmx15 cartridge. My old system was a Thorens 165 with a Stanton 681 EEE cartridge. I am still using the same receiver, speaker, and equalizer. It was a big gamble for me. I am a baby boomer with over 400 records in my collection. I'm a rock n' roller. I could care less about concertos. This review is for all of you baby boomer rock n' rollers out there that are wondering if it's worth it to spend SO MUCH MONEY on nothing more than a turntable. Let me tell you I was nervous. Setting up the tone arm and cartridge took me three hours. Not because it was hard to do, but because I was splitting millimeters in my vertical and arc alignments. Reading glasses isn't enough to do this job, you have to be able to focus within an inch or two of the needle in order to set the vertical alignment. I took out my contacts because I'm near sighted and that helped me focus up close. The directions that the tone arm and cartridge manufacuturers gave were straight forward. VPI predrilled the holes for the tonearm and everything went together easy. VPI had their own instruction manual and it was OK. So here is the moment of truth. I have a record collection nearly 20 to 30 years old. Will my favorite records sound better? The acid test for me was starting out with the following albums: "In Search of the Lost Chord" by the Moody Blues, followed by Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon", Jethro Tull's "Aqualung", Jefferson Starship's "Freedom At Point Zero", Styx's "Equinox", Loverboy's "Keep it Up" and finally mellowing out with Renaissance's "Scheherazade". Now those albums encompass a capella vocals with harmony, solo guitar rifts, piano jams, harpsicord, symphony accompaniment, hard base and drum beats, violin, flute. It's all there. So ... drum roll please ... can you say the word "PRESENSE"?. Can you also say the word "ENUNCIATION"? I couldn't believe my ears. It was like they were right there in front of me. I could hear words I never heard before, and I'm 30 years older and losing my hearing. I could hear the flutter in the voice, the breaths between the flute notes. I heard instruments that I had never heard before. Am I happy. Oh yeah, quite happy. Was it worth the enormous expense? Oh yeah, now I can listen to my music instead of the crap thats on the radio now. One reviewer mentioned that th

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Used product for:   1 to 3 months

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   2001

Price Paid:    $1795.00

Purchased At:   AudioAdvisor



Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:4
Submitted by Philip Canard a Audio Enthusiast

Date Reviewed: May 19, 2002

Bottom Line:   
I bought a complete setup: turntable, dust cover, Audioquest PT6 tonearm, and a used Grado MR8 cartridge. The sound was a revelation, as I had never owned a turntable nearly as good as this one. However, there are two problems with my setup as it came. The motor had to be replaced as the pulley was machined a bit oversized and it slipped on the motor shaft. VPI sent out a complete new motor/pulley assembly immediately. Their customer service is top notch if you ever have a problem. The stock rubber feet lets the powerful motor shake the table and lets noticeable 60 Hz rumble into the sound. A set of Tip Toes aluminum cones solved that problem very well. Low level information became much more apparent and the 60 Hz rumble was greatly reduced. This is the most cost effective upgrade you can make to the table. Upgrading to PT8 wiring is much more expensive, so I haven't done it yet. The PT6 tonearm sounds fine with lower priced cartridges, however. My Grado cartridge is unshielded and there is 60 Hz hum that is noticeable as the cartridge approaches the spindle when playing the inner grooves. I offer no solution for that other than another brand of cartridge that is shielded. The tradeoff is that it might not sound as open and dynamic as the Grado. The hum is not too noticeable, and the Grado is so good otherwise, that I have not bothered with replacing it. Four stars is as high as I will rate any turntable, as I think this category of equipment is overpriced in general due to the very limited production of equipment compared to amplifiers, speakers, and digital gear. I give it my highest 4 star rating for performance and value.

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Used product for:   More than 1 year

Duration Product Used:   Audio Enthusiast

Product model year:   Pre 1995

Price Paid:    $950.00

Purchased At:   John Fort Audio




Reviews 1 - 5 (19 Reviews Total) | Next 15

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